Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file:

AA
BB

This command prints out:

$ awk 'BEGIN { system("awk '"'"'{print}'"'"' file") }'

AA
BB

The same, but in the 'printf':

$ awk 'BEGIN { system("awk '"'"'{printf "%s ", $0}'"'"' file") }'

/bin/sh: Illegal option -,

How to improve the last command to get the result:

AA BB

Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This might work for you:

awk 'BEGIN{system("awk '\''{printf \"%s \", $0} END { print \"\" }'\'' file")}'
AA BB 

or more easily:

awk 'BEGIN{system("paste -sd\" \" file")}'
AA BB
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for good solution. –  Tedee12345 Apr 23 '12 at 5:23

Hopefully, your question is merely an exercise in curiosity. There are undoubtedly better ways to accomplish whatever you might be trying to do if it's not.

Rather than trying to use complex sequences of open and close single and double quotes which may have odd side effects if they're not paired up properly, you can use variables to represent quotes. By having, in essence, third-level quoting, it makes the code easier to read. The technique below is somewhat analogous to Perl's q() quoting.

Set a variable q to the octal equivalent of a single quote, then you can do this:

awk 'BEGIN{q = "\047"; system("awk " q "{print}" q " file")}'

Spacing is up to you - each string segment is concatenated to its adjacent segments.

This is another way that you might find more readable:

awk 'BEGIN{q = "\047"; system("awk " q"{print}"q " file")}'
share|improve this answer
    
I ask about solution from curiosity only. I know there are better ways to solve this problem. Thank you for the information. –  Tedee12345 Apr 23 '12 at 5:18

If you want to do it purely in awk you could try something like this:

awk '{printf "%s ", $0} END { print "" }'  <  aabb.txt
share|improve this answer
    
It thanks but it walks about something other me. I want to use this command so: awk 'BEGIN { system("awk '"'"'{printf "%s ", $0} END { print "" }'"'"' file") }' –  Tedee12345 Apr 22 '12 at 19:40

Simple, don't use awk; use tr.

tr '\n' ' ' file; echo;  

Or, if you need all that in one pipeline

tr '\n' ' ' file | awk 'END { print }'
share|improve this answer
    
It thanks but it walks about something other me. I want to use this command so: awk 'BEGIN { system("awk '"'"'{printf "%s ", $0} END { print "" }'"'"' file") }' –  Tedee12345 Apr 22 '12 at 19:41
    
@Tedee12345 why do you want to do all that pointless system nonsense? –  Dave Apr 22 '12 at 20:24
    
I want to use system() from two causes. 1. For educational. 2. I want to use system() in my function. –  Tedee12345 Apr 22 '12 at 20:37
    
@Tedee12345 This is not a function in which system is appropriate. 1. It teaches you a bad practice, making it the opposite of educational. 2. You "want" needless complexity? –  Dave Apr 22 '12 at 20:57
    
I ask about solution from curiosity only. I know there are better ways to solve this problem. –  Tedee12345 Apr 23 '12 at 4:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.