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What is the fastest way to reposition a sublist from a list in Python?

Let's say we have a list L = [a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h], now I want to take [c,d,e] and put it after g in the list. How can I do this fast?

Edit: In other words I would like to write a function that:

  1. extracts a sublist L_sub of length n from L, leaving L_temp
  2. insert the items of L_sub at a given position i into L_temp

The main question I guess is how to insert a list into list as fast as possible.

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5  
How do you know that c,d,e are the items you want to move? Are they fixed-position, or are you checking values? –  AJ. Apr 22 '12 at 19:35
    
What if the sublist overlaps the insertion point? –  Colt 45 Apr 22 '12 at 20:23
    
This is not possible, @lazyr's answer also prevents this. –  TTT Apr 23 '12 at 8:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I assume OP wants to do this inplace.

The key to making the operation fast is to minimize the creation of lists and the shortening/lengthening of lists. This means we must strive to always do a 1:1 assignment of list indices, so no L[i:i] = L[a:b] and no L[a:b] = []. Using loops with insert and pop is even worse, because then you shorten and lengthen the list many times. Concatenating lists is also bad because you first have to create one list for each part and then create larger and larger concatenated lists, once for each +. Since you want to do this "inplace", you'd have to assign the generated list to L[:] in the end.

    # items:   0 | 1   2   3 | 4   5   6   7 | 8   9
    #            a   span1   b     span2     c
    # pos:       1           4               8

    # Result:
    #          0 | 4   5   6   7 | 1   2   3 | 8   9
    #            a     span2         span2   c

Lets first make an observation. If a = start, b = end = start + length, and c is the insert position, then the operation we wish to do is to cut at the | markers and swap span1 and span2. But if b = start and c = end and a is the insert position, then we also want to swap span1 and span2. So in our function, we just deal with two consecutive segments that must be swapped.

We can't wholly avoid making new lists, because we need to store overlapping values while moving stuff around. We can however make the list as short as possible, by choosing which of the two spans to store to a temporary list.

def inplace_shift(L, start, length, pos):
    if pos > start + length:
        (a, b, c) = (start, start + length, pos)
    elif pos < start:
        (a, b, c) = (pos, start, start + length)
    else:
        raise ValueError("Cannot shift a subsequence to inside itself")
    if not (0 <= a < b < c <= len(L)):
        msg = "Index check 0 <= {0} < {1} < {2} <= {3} failed."
        raise ValueError(msg.format(a, b, c, len(L)))

    span1, span2 = (b - a, c - b)
    if span1 < span2:
        tmp = L[a:b]
        L[a:a + span2] = L[b:c]
        L[c - span1:c] = tmp
    else:
        tmp = L[b:c]
        L[a + span2:c] = L[a:b]
        L[a:a + span2] = tmp

Kos seems to have made an error in his timings, so I redid them with his code after correcting the arguments (calculating end from start and length), and these are the results, from slowest to fastest.

Nick Craig-Wood: 100 loops, best of 3: 8.58 msec per loop 
vivek: 100 loops, best of 3: 4.36 msec per loop
PaulP.R.O. (deleted?): 1000 loops, best of 3: 838 usec per loop
unbeli: 1000 loops, best of 3: 264 usec per loop
lazyr: 10000 loops, best of 3: 44.6 usec per loop

I have not tested that any of the other approaches yield correct results.

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The previous version you posted worked, this one does not: x = range(10); inplace_shift(x, 2,3,0) returns [0, 1, 0, 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], this should be [2, 3, 4, 0, 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. –  TTT Apr 22 '12 at 22:18
1  
@TTT fixed, indentation error. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Apr 22 '12 at 22:20
    
This produces incorrect results. If I call inplace_shift(range(10), 3, 2, 6) I get [0, 1, 2, 5, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]. It SHOULD produce [0, 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 3, 4, 8, 9] –  Colt 45 Apr 23 '12 at 17:04
    
@Colt 45: This is just a matter of calling convention. Should pos be interpreted as where to insert before "cutting" the slice to move, or after? If you prefer the latter, insert if pos > start: pos += length as the first line of the function. I prefer the former since then inserting at the end a list L is always the pos len(L) -- there's no need to take the length of the slice into account. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Apr 23 '12 at 19:43
    
@Colt 45: Then again, with my calling convention you have to watch out so you don't "paste" to a position inside the slice you're going to move, so it's really down to taste. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Apr 23 '12 at 19:51

I would do it with python substrings

def subshift(L, start, end, insert_at):
    temp = L[start:end]
    L = L[:start] + L[end:]
    return L[:insert_at] + temp + L[insert_at:]

print subshift(['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h'], 2, 5, 4)

start and end refer to the position of the substring to cut out (end is non-exclusive in the usual python style. insert_at refers to the position to insert the sub string back in again after it has been cut out.

I think this will be faster than any solution with iteration in it if the substrings are more than a character or two in length as nice optimised C code is doing the heavy lifting.

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>>> L = ['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h']
>>> L[7:7] = L[2:5]
>>> L[2:5] = []
>>> L
['a', 'b', 'f', 'g', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'h']
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Wouldn't this misbehave if you'd try to insert 5:7 at 2? The second L[2:5] would then refer to a different place than the first L[2:5] –  Kos Apr 22 '12 at 20:38
    
Try L = range(5) and subshift [3:5] to 0; expected ` [3, 4, 0, 1, 2]` actual [3, 4, 0, 3, 4] –  Kos Apr 22 '12 at 20:44
    
This appears to be the fastest approach from what's posted so far, but the indices in the second assignment need to be offset to also work in the case I've mentioned. –  Kos Apr 22 '12 at 20:47
    
@Kos you don't have to be too stupid with this. Just calculate the indicies correctly. –  unbeli Apr 23 '12 at 18:51

Let's check what we got so far:

Code

def subshift(L, start, end, insert_at):
    'Nick Craig-Wood'
    temp = L[start:end]
    L = L[:start] + L[end:]
    return L[:insert_at] + temp + L[insert_at:]

# (promising but buggy, needs correction;
# see comments at unbeli's answer)
def unbeli(x, start, end, at): 
    'unbeli'
    x[at:at] = x[start:end]
    x[start:end] = []

def subshift2(L, start, length, pos):
    'PaulP.R.O.'
    temp = pos - length
    S = L[start:length+start]
    for i in range(start, temp):
        L[i] = L[i + length]
    for i in range(0,length):
        L[i + temp] = S[i]
    return L

def shift(L,start,n,i):
    'vivek'
    return L[:start]+L[start+n:i]+L[start:start+n]+L[i:]

Benchmarks:

> args = range(100000), 3000, 2000, 60000

> timeit subshift(*args)
100 loops, best of 3: 6.43 ms per loop

  > timeit unbeli(*args)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 631 ns per loop

> timeit subshift2(*args)
100 loops, best of 3: 11 ms per loop

> timeit shift(*args)
100 loops, best of 3: 4.28 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
You seem to be testing two different cases. In subshift and unbeli, you're using start, end as arguments, which means the slice you're moving is empty with the arguments you're using. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Apr 22 '12 at 21:32

Here is an alternate inplace solution:

def movesec(l,srcIndex,n,dstIndex):
    if srcIndex+n>dstIndex: raise ValueError("overlapping indexes")
    for i in range(n):
        l.insert(dstIndex+1,l.pop(srcIndex))

    return l


print range(10)
print movesec(range(10),3,2,6)     

Output:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]    # orginal
[0, 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 3, 4, 8, 9]    # modified
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this is not "inplace". –  unbeli Apr 23 '12 at 18:54
    
@unbeli: It seems to be. Try commenting out return l and call this with a list. Compare the list before and after. Isn't that 'inplace'? I just have the return l as a convenience... –  Colt 45 Apr 23 '12 at 19:25
def shift(L,start,n,i):
    return L[:start]+L[start+n:i]+L[start:start+n]+L[i:]
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