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I must have missed something. I'm doing an exercise to learn c++ and it asks that if a user inputs either c,p,t or g character then carry on, otherwise re-request prompt, so I wrote this:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(void){
  cout << "Please enter one of the following choices:" << endl;
  cout << "c) carnivore\t\t\tp) pianist\n";
  cout << "t) tree\t\t\t\tg) game\n";
  char ch;
  do{
    cout << "Please enter a c, p, t, or g: ";
    cin >> ch;
    cout << "\"" << ch << "\"" << endl;
  }while(ch != 'c' || ch != 'p' || ch != 't' || ch != 'g');

  cout << "End" << endl;

  cin.clear();
  cin.ignore();
  cin.get();

  return 0;
}

This does not work and all I get is the prompt re-requesting it even when pressing either of the correct characters.

However if I change this line:

while(ch != 'c' || ch != 'p' || ch != 't' || ch != 'g');

to

while(ch != 'c' && ch != 'p' && ch != 't' && ch != 'g');

why is that? My understanding is that the "OR" statement should work as one of the tests is correct.

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1  
The OR "working" means the loop evaluates to true, causing it to loop again. –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 19:42
    
You can condense that loop by just using a while loop as well: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/input-output.html#faq-15.3 –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

why is that? My understanding is that the "OR" statement should work as one of the tests is correct.

Exactly. There is always one of the tests that passes. A character will either be not 'c', or not 'p'. It can't be both 'c' and 'p'. So the condition is always true, leading to an infinite loop.

The alternative condition with the conjunctions works because it is false as soon as ch is equal to one of the alternatives: one of the inequalities is false, and thus the whole condition is false.

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1  
Just to be pedantic, a character can be not c and not p. :-) But the gist of your answer is correct (i.e., if the character is c, it is by definition not p). –  vanza Apr 22 '12 at 19:46
    
@vanza: R. Martinho Fernandes' description isn't at all in conflict with your clarification. In English prose 'or' isn't necessarily exclusive; whether or not it's exclusive is generally determined by context. That's one reason why English would make a poor programming language. –  Michael Burr Apr 22 '12 at 20:01

My understanding is that the "OR" statement should work as one of the tests is correct.

Well, you could use ||, but the expression would have to be:

while(!(ch == 'c' || ch == 'p' || ch == 't' || ch == 'g'));

By applying the De Morgan's law, the above simplifies to:

while(ch != 'c' && ch != 'p' && ch != 't' && ch != 'g');
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1  
That DeMorgan, so caring for the needs of programmers everywhere. –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 19:45

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