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A column height is integer type in my SQL Server table. I want to do a division and have the result as decimal in my query:

Select (height/10) as HeightDecimal

How do I cast so that the HeightDecimal is no longer integer? Thanks.

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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted
SELECT height/10.0 AS HeightDecimal FROM dbo.whatever;

If you want a specific precision scale, then say so:

SELECT CONVERT(DECIMAL(16,4), height/10.0) AS HeightDecimal
  FROM dbo.whatever;
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+1 for the first part, but beware of the second example. This CONVERT is applied post-divide and cannot give you more than the 6 decimal places that you already have. –  Jirka Hanika Dec 17 '12 at 12:30
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SELECT CAST(height AS DECIMAL(18,0)) / 10

Edit: How this works under the hood?

The result type is the same as the type of both arguments, or, if they are different, it is determined by the data type precedence table. You can therefore cast either argument to something non-integral.

Now DECIMAL(18,0), or you could equivalently write just DECIMAL, is still a kind of integer type, because that default scale of 0 means "no digits to the right of the decimal point". So a cast to it might in different circumstances work well for rounding to integers - the opposite of what we are trying to accomplish.

However, DECIMALs have their own rules for everything. They are generally non-integers, but always exact numerics. The result type of the DECIMAL division that we forced to occur is determined specially to be, in our case, DECIMAL(29,11). The result of the division will therefore be rounded to 11 places which is no concern for division by 10, but the rounding becomes observable when dividing by 3. You can control the amount of rounding by manipulating the scale of the left hand operand. You can also round more, but not less, by placing another ROUND or CAST operation around the whole expression.

Identical mechanics governs the simpler and nicer solution in the accepted answer:

  SELECT height / 10.0

In this case, the type of the divisor is DECIMAL(3,1) and the type of the result is DECIMAL(17,6). Try dividing by 3 and observe the difference in rounding.

If you just hate all this talk of precisions and scales, and just want SQL server to perform all calculations in good old double precision floating point arithmetics from some point on, you can force that, too:

SELECT height / CAST(10 AS FLOAT(53))

or equivalently just

SELECT height / CAST (10 AS FLOAT)
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Okay, but that's because you applied an additional operation after the cast. I'm talking about documenting the intended output here, so what is wrong with saying SELECT CAST(1234567/1000000.0 as DECIMAL(19,5)) instead of SELECT CAST(1234567/1000000.0 as DECIMAL)? Do you know what happens in the latter case when you don't specify precision/scale? You should try it. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 23 '12 at 13:28
    
In the latter case I expect 1 and I don't really see any use of casting to DECIMAL post-divide, except perhaps to do rounding. On the other hand I have nothing against using the clearer 10.0 to force the right operation and so I happen to be upping your answer. I'm thinking of editing a kind of result of this discussion into yours and deleting mine. –  Jirka Hanika Apr 23 '12 at 14:15
    
I don't think everyone would expect 1 when casting as a DECIMAL - if they did, then why not just say INT? The reason to cast explicitly I mentioned in another comment below - documentation. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 23 '12 at 14:16
    
Casting to exact numerics causes rounding. My cat knows that. But I'll try some edit later if you are saying that DECIMAL(19,0) looks better in the original context than DECIMAL. –  Jirka Hanika Apr 23 '12 at 17:50
    
I think you're being purposely obtuse to try and wave away my point. And that's ok. Hopefully other readers will benefit from my comments even if you choose to trivialize it. Being explicit can produce reliably consistent results and can help your code be more self-documenting. Not bothering because you assert that you have no control anyway does neither. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 23 '12 at 18:08
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You can either cast Height as a decimal:

select cast(@height as decimal(10, 5))/10 as heightdecimal

or you place a decimal point in your value you are dividing by:

declare @height int
set @height = 1023

select @height/10.0 as heightdecimal

see sqlfiddle with an example

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decimal(anything,anything)? Why not specify? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 20:10
    
you are right, fixed. –  bluefeet Apr 22 '12 at 20:14
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select cast (height as decimal)/10 as HeightDecimal
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decimal(anything,anything)? Why not specify? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 20:10
    
You are right about division, but can produce overflow problem for example for multiplication. decimal(h)*10 in general may not be equal to decimal(g*10), thinking such way I have brought up the habit to cast first before operation –  Dewfy Apr 22 '12 at 20:25
2  
I agree an explicit cast before operations is better. But my point was that if you're going to say decimal you should say decimal(precision,scale). –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 20:58
    
@AaronBertrand - It depends on circumstances. I'd agree with you when specifying database schema (especially stored procedure parameters). However, the burden of proof of usefulness, is on the side arguing presence, not on absence, of particular piece of code. –  Jirka Hanika Apr 23 '12 at 8:26
1  
If I'm the app developer and I need to consume your query and/or write an interface to it, wouldn't you rather specify your intent for the data type so I know what to expect, rather than have me go through a bunch of tests and/or track you down and ask you? Do you also leave out the length specification for char/varchar/nchar/nvarchar for similar reasons? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 23 '12 at 13:26
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