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As the title says, I need to modify the ith element of an array passed by reference...

I have the following situation:

function1(Node *&array, int i) {
   array = array +i; // crash!!!
   // operation on array[i]
}

function2() {
   Node** array;
   // filling the array bla bla bla
   function1(*(array+0), i);
}

The question is: what am I doing wrong when I write array = array +i;???

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
You should specify what // crash!!! means, it's probably not crashing on that line. BTW, are you aware that you're modifying the incoming pointer (I mean in the calling scope)? – enobayram Apr 22 '12 at 20:15
1  
Why do you pass by reference? – Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '12 at 20:19
    
So that I can modify the actual array and be more efficient... – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 20:28
    
You just can't change the reference after initializing it! – parallelgeek Apr 22 '12 at 20:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think your function1 is designed incorrectly. Rather than attempting to pass an index, I would simply pass the i-th element.

function1(Node* array) {
    array->foo = ....
}

and call it like this:

function1(array[i]);

You really ought to get out of the habit of using the + operator as a means to index an array. Use the indexing [] syntax. I know that they can be interchangeable but the indexing syntax conveys intent.


In the comments you state that the index is in fact only known inside function1 and is in fact not a parameter as stated in the question. In that case, pass Node** to function1.

Your code with the reference parameter modifies array[0] because that's the Node* reference that you passed in. But you want to modify the i-th node. If you pass a reference to a Node* then you can only modify that one object. In order to do what you need then you need to pass Node**.

share|improve this answer
    
I would do that, but unfortunately I can determine the index only within function 1... – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 20:21
1  
That's not what your code says. Your code asks the caller to pass the index. – David Heffernan Apr 22 '12 at 20:21
    
Yes I know, but that's not the case in the real program. I wrote that because I was concentrated on the other argument... sorry about that :p – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 20:27
    
In which case you need to pass Node** to the function – David Heffernan Apr 22 '12 at 20:31
    
Do you mean as follows? function1(Node ** array) { // calculating i array = array +i; // operation on array[i] } function2() { Node** array; // filling the array bla bla bla function1(array); } – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 20:39

Since array is declared as type pointer-to-pointer-to-Node, then the argument *(array+0) (which evaluates to *array) is type pointer-to-Node. So you should declare

function1(Node *array, int i)

if you want to treat array as type pointer-to-Node within the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. But isn'it more efficient if I pass the argument only by reference? – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 20:20
    
In this particular case, no. You're passing a pointer either way. – Adam Liss Apr 22 '12 at 20:24
    
Ok... but how shall I access the i-th element of the array within function1 if I declared how you've suggested? THanks again – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 20:35
    
array is of type pointer-to-Node. You can access the ith Node as array[i] (preferred) or *(array+i) (harder to read). – Adam Liss Apr 22 '12 at 20:57
    
Thank you for your reply. But if I do that and I write if(array[i] == NULL) Visual Studio tells me: No operand "==" found for that... :( – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 21:05

Assuming you're attempting to modify an array element, you only need to pass a pointer or reference to the array element you want to modify.

Example 1: Pass a reference to the element that you want to operate on.

function1(Node &element) {
   // operation on element
}

function2() {
   Node** array;
   // filling the array bla bla bla
   function1(array[0][i]);
}

Example 2: Pass a pointer to the element that you want to operate on.

function1(Node *element) {
   // operation on *element
}

function2() {
   Node** array;
   // filling the array bla bla bla
   function1(*array + i);
}

Example 3: Pass a pointer to the array and the index of the element.

function1(Node *array, int i) {
   Node *element = array + i;
   // operation on *element
}

function2() {
   Node** array;
   // filling the array bla bla bla
   function1(*array, i);
}

Example 4: As example 3 but using a local reference.

function1(Node *array, int i) {
   Node &element = array[i];
   // operation on element
}

function2() {
   Node** array;
   // filling the array bla bla bla
   function1(*array, i);
}

Example 5: As example 3 but reusing the parameter as a local variable. Note that this only works because array isn't a reference! You should probably avoid this style.

function1(Node *array, int i) {
   array += i;
   // operation on *array
}

function2() {
   Node** array;
   // filling the array bla bla bla
   function1(*array, i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply! I believe I'm interested in example 1: the only thing is that I know the right the index only in function 1. To be more precise, I'll write a similar example of What I actually need to do. Thank you in advance! function1(Node &array) { // calculating i Node *pointerToNewNode; // creating the new node j = 0; if(array[i][j] == NULL) array[i][j] = *pointer; else array[i][++j] = *pointer; } function2() { Node** array; // filling the array bla bla bla function1(array); } – user1346664 Apr 22 '12 at 21:02
    
@user1346664 array[i][j] can't equal NULL because it's a Node. – Neil Apr 22 '12 at 21:11
    
None of these examples are appropriate. Node** is an array of pointers to Node. It is not an array of Node. – David Heffernan Apr 22 '12 at 21:11

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