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I would like to format some double values to a specific number of digits ignoring starting zeros.

Example, lets say format to 6 digits:

131.468627436358  ->  131.469
3.16227766016838  ->  3.16228
0.66018099039325  ->  0.660181
0.02236067977499  ->  0.0223607
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5  
java.text.DecimalFormat –  Mike Samuel Apr 22 '12 at 20:04
    
what have you tried? –  twain249 Apr 22 '12 at 20:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

BigDecimal allows handling of significant figures correctly. This:

MathContext round3SigFig = new MathContext(3,RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
System.out.println((new BigDecimal(0.000923874932)).round(round3SigFig));

produces:

0.000924

Obviously, though, passing your floating points through an arbitrary precision object representation isn't ideal.

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Consider this as the last chance option: How about converting the number to string, taking first six digits with having the "," in mind and converting back to double.

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I believe this is closely related to the following question: Format double values using a maximum of five total digits, rounding decimal digits if necessary

There's an answer in the question I linked to which uses MathContext and BigDecimal (like maybeWeCouldStealAVan's answer). However, that didn't quite work for me because I cared about the total number of digits. It may work for you, however.

I ended up writing my own custom solution which formatted exactly as I needed. Perhaps this also meets your requirements, or can be easily modified to meet them:

public static String format( double value, int totalDigits )
{
    String s = String.valueOf( value );
    int decimal = s.indexOf( '.' );

    // there is no decimal part, so simply return the String
    if ( decimal == -1 )
    {
        return s;
    }
    else
    {
        int finalLength;

        // example: 23.34324
        // the final result will be length totalDigits + 1 because we will include the decimal
        if ( decimal < totalDigits )
        {
            finalLength = totalDigits + 1;
        }
        // example: 99999
        // the final result will be length totalDigits because there will be no decimal
        else if ( decimal == totalDigits )
        {
            finalLength = totalDigits;
        }
        // example: 999999.999
        // we can't make the final length totalDigits because the integer portion is too large
        else
        {
            finalLength = decimal;
        }

        finalLength = Math.min( s.length( ), finalLength );

        return s.substring( 0, finalLength );
    }
}

public static void main( String[] args )
{
    double[] data = { 1, 100, 1000, 10000, 100000, 99999, 99999.99, 9999.99, 999.99, 23.34324, 0.111111 };
    for ( double d : data )
    {
        System.out.printf( "Input: %10s \tOutput: %10s\n", Double.toString( d ), format( d, 5 ) );
    }
}
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Use logarithmic Functions to calculate the number of additional digits you need.

public static int leadingZeros (double d) {
    return (d >= 1.0) ? 0 : (int) (-1 * (Math.floor (Math.log (d) / Math.log (10))));
}

For

    System.out.println (leadingZeros (4));
    System.out.println (leadingZeros (0.4));
    System.out.println (leadingZeros (0.04));
    System.out.println (leadingZeros (0.004));

it return 0, 1, 2, 3.

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