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I am trying to implement operator+ (which has to concatenate singly linked lists from two objects of the same class) for my class, but the program gives out error: "Unhandled exception at 0x01351ca3 in lab5.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0xcccccccc." The weird thing is that it concatenates correctly, because I am checking it(by by //temp.print();) before i return temp in operator+.

If you could explain me where is my error I would really appreciate it. Here's the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

    class list{

    struct lista
    {
        int num;
        char* word;
        lista* next;
    };
    lista* head;
    char* name;
    public:
        list(char* name1){head=NULL;name=new char[strlen(name1)+1];strcpy(name,name1);}
        char getChar(int key, int index);
        void setChar(int key, int index, char c);
        void insert(int number,char* txt);
        void remove(int number);
        void print();
        list(const list &o);
        list& operator=(const list &x);
        list& operator+(list &x);
        ~list();
    };
    void list::insert(int number,char* txt){
        lista* ptr,*tmp;
            ptr=head;
        lista* newlista=new lista;
        newlista->num=number;
        newlista->next=NULL;
        newlista->word= new char[strlen(txt)+1];
        strcpy(newlista->word,txt);
        if(head==NULL){
            head=newlista;
            newlista->next=NULL;
        }
        else while(ptr!=NULL){
                if(strcmp(txt,ptr->word)>=0){
                    if(ptr->next!=NULL && strcmp(txt,ptr->next->word)<=0)
                {
                    tmp=ptr->next;
                    ptr->next=newlista;
                    newlista->next=tmp;
                    break;
                }
                    else if(ptr->next!=NULL && strcmp(txt,ptr->next->word)>0)
                        ptr=ptr->next;
                    else
                     {
                        //next is empty
                        ptr->next=newlista;
                        break;
                     }
        }
                else{
                    //txt less than in 1st element
                    newlista->next=head;
                    head=newlista;
                    break;
                }      
        }
        return;
    }

    void list::print(){
        cout<<name<<";"<<endl;
        lista *druk;
        druk=head;
        while(druk!=NULL){
            cout<<"txt: "<<druk->word<<" | "<<"num: "<<druk->num<<endl;
            druk=druk->next;
        }
        cout<<endl;
        return;
    }


    void list::remove(int number){
        if(head==NULL)
            return;
        if(head->num==number){
            lista* ptr=head;
            head=head->next;
            delete [] ptr->word;
            delete ptr;
            return;
        }
        lista* ptr=head;
        while(ptr->next!=NULL && ptr->next->num!=number)
            ptr=ptr->next;
        if(ptr->next==NULL){
            cout<<number<<" element not found"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        lista* todelete=ptr->next;
        ptr->next=todelete->next;
        delete [] todelete->word;
        delete todelete;
        return;
    }
    list::list(const list &o)
    {
        lista *xtr = o.head;
        head=NULL;// without it doesn't work.
        lista *etr=head;// set etr on head?
        while (xtr)
        {
    lista* ntr = new lista;
        if (!ntr)
            {
    cerr << "list::CopyConstructor: Allocation memory failure!";
    cerr << endl;
    break;
            }
    ntr->num = xtr->num;
    ntr->word= new char[strlen(xtr->word)+1];
    strcpy(ntr->word,xtr->word);
    ntr->next = NULL;
        if (head)
            etr->next = ntr;    
        else
            head = ntr;
    etr = ntr; // keep track of the last element in *this
    xtr = xtr->next;
        }
    name = new char[strlen(o.name)+5];
    strcpy(name,o.name);
    strcat(name,"Copy");
    }

    list& list::operator=(const list &x)
    {
        if(this==&x)
            return *this;
        lista *etr=head;
        while(etr) // removing list from this
        {
            etr=etr->next;
            delete head;
            head=etr;
        }
        lista *xtr=x.head;
        while(xtr)
        {
            int copied=xtr->num;
            lista *ntr= new lista;
            ntr->word=new char[strlen(xtr->word)+1];
            if (!ntr) 
                {
    cerr << "list::operator=: Allocation memory failure!" << endl;
    break;
                }
            ntr->num=copied;
            strcpy(ntr->word,xtr->word);
            ntr->next=NULL;
            if (!head)
                head = ntr;
            else
                etr->next = ntr;

                etr = ntr; // keep track of the last element in *this
                xtr = xtr->next;
    }
    char *name=new char[strlen(x.name)+1];
    strcpy(name,x.name);
    return *this;
    }

    list::~list()
    {
        cout<<"Object with name:"<<name<<" destroyed!"<<endl;
        delete [] name;
        lista *dtr=head;
        while(dtr) // removing lista from this
        {
            dtr=dtr->next;
            delete [] head->word;
            delete head;
            head=dtr;
        }

    }

    list& list::operator+(list &x)
    {
        list temp(this->name);
        temp=*this;// using previously made operator= which creates the deep copy of singly linked list from this into temp;
        lista *xtr=x.head;
        while(xtr)
        {
            temp.insert(xtr->num,xtr->word);
            xtr=xtr->next;
        }   
        //temp.print();
        return temp;
    }
    int main(){
        list l1("lista1");
        l1.insert(5,"Endian");
        l1.insert(7,"Endianness");
        l1.insert(100,"Hexediting");
        l1.insert(34,".mil");

        l1.print();
        list l2(l1); // usage of CC - the same as list l2=l1; 
        l2.print();
        l2.remove(5);
        l2.print();
        l1.print();

        list l3("asajnment");
            l3=l2=l1;
        l3.print();
        list l4("Testing+");
        l4.insert(155,"+++++++");
        l4.insert(144,"-----");
        l4.insert(111,"lalala");
        l4.print();
        l1=l4+l3;
        l1.print();
        getchar();
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
1  
IMHO Thats strange to have operator+, which returns list&. Semantically its like operator+=, which should modify its lhs. It's better to change the name, or to have list operator+, which constructs new object. –  parallelgeek Apr 22 '12 at 20:23
3  
Sample code should be complete and concise–enough to recreate the issue but no more. The posted sample has too much extraneous code. –  outis Apr 22 '12 at 20:51
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2 Answers

I don't think you should be returning a reference in your operator+

list list::operator+(list &x)
    {
        list temp(this->name);
        temp=*this;// using previously made operator= which creates the deep copy of singly linked list from this into temp;
        lista *xtr=x.head;
        while(xtr)
        {
            temp.insert(xtr->num,xtr->word);
            xtr=xtr->next;
        }   
        //temp.print();
        return temp;
    }

if you want to return a reference for chaining like you mentioned in your comment:

list& list::operator+(list &x)
        {
            lista *xtr=x.head;
            while(xtr)
            {
                this->insert(xtr->num,xtr->word);
                xtr=xtr->next;
            }   
            return this;
        }

this will concatenate x's values to your current object.

Still your compiler should've warned you that you are returning a reference to a temporary.

Also you should start accepting more answers and consider what the viewers are thinking when they see your posts, do you think what you have posted is well formed, informative etc..?

share|improve this answer
    
I return reference in order to allow operator chaining, I mean a+b+c+d –  Matthew Grossman Apr 22 '12 at 20:44
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You are returning a reference to a temporary object. That is not correct.

When it gets used by outside code, the referenced object is already destroyed.

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