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I'm developing a web application using ASP.NET MVC (I'm new to the framework and actually quite new to web development in general). My application must support multiple languages - there's a bunch of countries for which I need the application to "speak" the local language.

The UI concept is common - have flag icons somewhere, usually the top, possibly with an additional drop-down to include less common languages. At this stage I don't want to get into automatically detecting the source country, but rather start with English and allow users to choose otherwise (and I would remember that setting of course).

I would like to know if there's any "framework" for supporting such multilingual views in ASP.NET MVC that will make the job easier.

Any recommendations?

Thanks

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I would dump the flag icons. Flags can change, some languages span multiple countries, etc. Flag icons for language selection is kind of old-school. Instead, have a dropdown with each language selection displayed in its own language. –  Mike Sickler Jun 23 '09 at 13:27
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I disagree. Having flags for your most commonly used languages saves a click and potential confusion. How would I know how to change the language if I landed on the page after someone changed it to arabic? The drop-down title wouldn't be "Select a language" anymore. –  PRINCESS FLUFF Aug 1 '09 at 13:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Check out these links: first second third

Worked for me. In view - HtmlHelper.Resource("greeting"); in controller - this.Resource("greeting");
in model i got my own localization implementation.


Make sure You check out this approach when considering localization implementation.

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It's very surprising that SO's search (or more precisely Microsoft's full-text search) did not find these questions... Apparently my use of "multilingual" was too much for it when it needs to be matched with "multi-lingual"... Thanks –  Roee Adler Jun 22 '09 at 13:31
    
I remember that one guy implemented localization by creating separated views for each language. That could be useful for more specific languages (i.e. Japanese), but would involve some serious routing ("Areas" technique by Phil Haack might work, check out @ google). –  Arnis L. Jun 22 '09 at 13:48

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