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Please review this statement:

   SELECT TableID FROM Table t1
   INNER JOIN BlackList b ON b.TableID <> t1.TableID

I was thinking this statement returned everything from Table that wasn't found in the Blacklist table, but instead it returned nothing at all (0 rows). If I'm trying to return everything from Table that IS NOT found in the Blacklist table, what's the best way to do this? I assume you can do this:

  SELECT TableID FROM (
    SELECT TableID, CASE WHEN b.TableID IS NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END OnBlackList 
    FROM Table t1
      LEFT JOIN Blacklist b ON b.TableID = t1.TableID
    ) tb1
  WHERE tb1.OnBlackList = 0

But I was looking for a shorter, more efficient solution. Any suggestions?

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1  
What is the difference between Table.ID and Table.TableID? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 22:12
    
@AaronBertrand, sorry,fixed it.. :) –  Control Freak Apr 22 '12 at 22:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One basic way is using a NOT EXISTS:

SELECT TableID FROM Table t1
where NOT EXISTS (select * from BlackList b where b.TableID = t1.TableID);

This will select rows in t1 that are not present in the BlackList table.

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This solution works faster than EXCEPT –  Control Freak Apr 22 '12 at 22:25
    
There are some complicated joins where I could see that EXCEPT might be faster/efficient. But just like UNION's and other similar functions, I recommend using them only when absolutely necessary. (I assume EXCEPT will actually calculate the full join, rather than just using the matching primary key.) Especially if you're dealing with primary keys the basic NOT EXISTS construction is highly likely to be faster. (And it's not db-specific.) –  Mike Ryan Apr 22 '12 at 22:32
1  
I think it's difficult to make such a sweeping statement. YMMV. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 22:37
SELECT TableID FROM dbo.Table
EXCEPT
SELECT TableID FROM dbo.Blacklist;
share|improve this answer
    
TY for your answer, Does Except run only on the columns in both selects? They must be the same amount and types of columns i assume? –  Control Freak Apr 22 '12 at 22:15
    
@AaronBertrand: You were quite right in your comment to my answer, on both counts (hence also why I wasn't familiar with EXCEPT). Deleted mine and upvoted yours. –  eggyal Apr 22 '12 at 22:15
    
EXCEPT is a great command, but when doing this on two blacklist tables, using NOT EXISTS works much faster. –  Control Freak Apr 22 '12 at 22:26
1  
OK, so use NOT EXISTS. <shrug> If you know enough to test performance between different methods, why aren't you looking up syntax alternatives on your own? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 22:27
SELECT TableT1.TableId FROM TableT1  
LEFT OUTER JOIN BlackList ON  
TableT1.TableID = BlackList.TableID  
where BlackList.TableId IS NULL

I wrote the above, but now I also found a previous question/ answer in StackOverflow: How to find rows in one table that have no corresponding row in another table

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2  
When publishing code it's good practice to use the code format tool, as with the other responses here. –  John Dewey Apr 22 '12 at 22:19

Also:

SELECT TableId FROM Table
WHERE TableId NOT IN (SELECT TableID FROM BlackList)

This will work regardless of the columns you add in the main select statement.

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Be very careful with NOT IN. This can return incorrect (or at least unexpected) results if TableID can be NULL. While unlikely in this specific case, future readers might not realize that TableID is probably the PK (and therefore not nullable). –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 22 '12 at 22:20

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