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How can I align two inline-blocks so that one is left and the other is right on the same line? Why is this so hard? Is there something like LaTeX's \hfill that can consume the space between them to achieve this?

I don't want to use floats because with inline-blocks I can line up the baselines. And when the window is too small for both of them, with inline-blocks I can just change the text-align to center and they will be centered one atop another. Relative(parent) + Absolute(element) positioning has the same problems as floats do.

The HTML5:

<header>
    <h1>Title</h1>
    <nav>
        <a>A Link</a>
        <a>Another Link</a>
        <a>A Third Link</a>
    </nav>
</header>

The css:

header {
    //text-align: center; // will set in js when the nav overflows (i think)
}

h1 {
    display: inline-block;
    margin-top: 0.321em;
}

nav {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: baseline;
}

Thery're right next to each other, but I want the nav on the right.

a diagram

share|improve this question
    
AFAIK the only way to solve this is to use floats or absolute positioning. You can achieve the same baseline position using margin-top on the nav. –  powerbuoy Apr 22 '12 at 22:22
    
Just use margin-top and floats. It's not possible to do this without that or absolute positioning. –  jdhartley Apr 22 '12 at 22:22
    
Use css media queries to change the css depending on the size of the viewport. You can use both position: absolute and inline-block –  elclanrs Apr 22 '12 at 22:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You can use the text-align: justify technique here.

.header {
    background: #ccc; 
    text-align: justify; 

    /* ie 7*/  
    *width: 100%;  
    *-ms-text-justify: distribute-all-lines;
    *text-justify: distribute-all-lines;
}
 .header:after{
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100%;
    height: 0;
    font-size:0;
    line-height:0;
}

h1 {
    display: inline-block;
    margin-top: 0.321em; 

    /* ie 7*/ 
    *display: inline;
    *zoom: 1;
    *text-align: left; 
}

.nav {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: baseline; 

    /* ie 7*/
    *display: inline;
    *zoom:1;
    *text-align: right;
}

The working example can be seen here: http://jsfiddle.net/skip405/NfeVh/4/. This code works from IE7 and above

If we don't care about IE7 simply omit the star-hack properties. The working example using your markup is here - http://jsfiddle.net/skip405/NfeVh/5/. I just added the header:after part and justified the content.

In order to solve the issue of the extra space that is inserted with the after pseudo-element one can do a trick of setting the font-size to 0 for the parent element and resetting it back to say 14px for the child elements. The working example of this trick can be seen here: http://jsfiddle.net/skip405/NfeVh/326/

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thank you. –  Mk12 Apr 23 '12 at 17:03
    
Is there any way to stop it from making the banner taller though? I realize how this is working, so I would assume there isn't. –  Mk12 Apr 23 '12 at 20:18
1  
If you're generating your content with javascript, note that this solution only works if there is whitespace between the elements. You will need to insert a text node between the left/right elements or they will both stick to the left. –  Stephen Nelson May 21 '13 at 2:13
1  
Would you mind to paste your code in here, as well? Links to external places have a habit of dying at some point, and if that happens, this otherwise useful answer will suddenly become useless. –  O. R. Mapper Nov 27 '13 at 22:53
2  
@ValerioColtrè I agree that the empty space is the most (and possibly, only!) annoying thing about this approach. Explicitly managing your font-size is rather undesirable. I propose a different solution. Note that the .header:after decorator adds one line of height equal to font-size. Luckily we know how much that is. It is exactly 1em! So, negative margins to the rescue! This fiddle shows how. –  Domi Oct 7 at 11:58

If you're already using JavaScript to center stuff when the screen is too small (as per your comment for your header), why not just undo floats/margins with JavaScript while you're at it and use floats and margins normally.

You could even use CSS media queries to reduce the amount JavaScript you're using.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I wasn't really thinking about that yet, it just seemed like it would be easier this way. But apparently not. Any hints as to how I would hook into the nav jumping to the next line from javascript? –  Mk12 Apr 22 '12 at 22:32
    
Ahh, I can use media queries for this! I thought those only were used on startup, not on resize. Thanks. –  Mk12 Apr 22 '12 at 22:35

If you don't want to use floats, you're going to have to wrap your nav:

<header>
<h1>Title</h1>
<div id="navWrap">
<nav>
    <a>A Link</a>
    <a>Another Link</a>
    <a>A Third Link</a>
</nav>
</div>
</header>

...and add some more specific css:

header {
//text-align: center; // will set in js when the nav overflows (i think)
width:960px;/*Change as needed*/
height:75px;/*Change as needed*/
}

h1 {
display: inline-block;
margin-top: 0.321em;
}

#navWrap{
position:absolute;
top:50px; /*Change as needed*/
right:0;
}

nav {
display: inline-block;
vertical-align: baseline;
}

You may need to do a little more, but that's a start.

share|improve this answer

give it float: right and the h1 float:left and put an element with clear:both after them.

share|improve this answer
    
"I don't want to use floats" –  powerbuoy Apr 22 '12 at 22:22
    
@powerbuoy funny he selected the solution with floats at the end, right? –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Apr 23 '12 at 13:00
    
@Italy: Only because I thought it was the only possible way—I have changed my accepted answer. –  Mk12 Apr 23 '12 at 17:03

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