Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was under the impression that blocks were supposed to resemble first-class functions and allow for lambda calc-style constructs. From a previous question however, I was told they are actually just objects.

Then I have 2 questions really:

  1. Besides the feature of having access to their defining scope, which I guess makes them usable in a way resembling C++ "friendship", why would one go for a block instead of an object then? Are they more lightweight? Because if not I might as well keep passing objects as parameters instead of blocks.

  2. Do blocks have a way of keeping an internal state? for instance, some variable declared inside the block which will retain its value across invocations.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Besides the feature of having access to their defining scope, which I guess makes them usable in a way resembling C++ "friendship", why would one go for a block instead of an object then?

Flexibility. Less to implement. A block is able to represent more than a parameter list or specific object type.

Are they more lightweight?

Not necessarily. Just consider them another tool in the toolbox, and use them where appropriate (or required).

Do blocks have a way of keeping an internal state? for instance, some variable declared inside the block which will retain its value across invocations.

Yes, they are able to perform reference counting as well as copy stack objects. That doesn't necessarily make them lighter-weight to use than an object representing the parameters you need.

Related

What's the difference between NSInvocation and block?

share|improve this answer

blocks were supposed to resemble first-class functions [...] they are actually just objects.

They are in fact first-class functions, implemented for the purposes of ObjC as objects. In plain-C, where they are also available, they have a closely-related but non-object-based implementation. You can think about them in whichever way is most convenient at the moment.

why would one go for a block instead of an object then?

A block is an executable chunk of code which automatically captures variables from its enclosing scope. The state and actions of a custom object have to be more explicitly handled, and are less generic; you can't use any old object as a completion argument, whereas an executable object fits that bill perfectly.

Do blocks have a way of keeping an internal state? for instance, some variable declared inside the block which will retain its value across invocations.

Sure, you can declare a static variable just like you could with a function or method:

void (^albatross)(void);
albatross = ^{
            static int notoriety;
            NSLog(@"%d", notoriety++);
        };

albatross();
albatross();
albatross();
albatross();
share|improve this answer
    
see that's funny! I just started that question because I tried declaring a static inside a block but the problem is that even if I destroy the object where the block is defined / declared, allocating a new instance of such object does not realloc the static. Which is my main problem. Take a look: stackoverflow.com/questions/10273006/… –  SaldaVonSchwartz Apr 23 '12 at 2:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.