Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to figure out how I would draw a syntax tree for the expression below. First, how exactly is this behaving? It looks like it takes 1 and 2 as parameters, and if n is 0, it will just return m.

<code>Add</code> definition

Also, could someone point a start off to parse tree, or an example? I haven't been able to find one.

share|improve this question
1  
Consider the else branch as well .. it makes a recursive call where one argument is incremented, the other argument is decremented, and eventually that decremented argument will become zero -- assuming the initial call was with positive arguments. –  sarnold Apr 23 '12 at 1:22
    
thanks sarnold, whats incrementing and whats doing the decrementing here? –  jfisk Apr 23 '12 at 1:39
1  
The pred n is doing the decrementing (predecessor) and the succ m is doing the incrementing (successor). –  sarnold Apr 23 '12 at 3:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Once the function is defined, you do applications of the arguments on the function itself, returning, thus, new functions, resultants of the applied args.

I'm not sure which language you used to wirte that code, but the application would result in something like:

\f.\n.\m.if isZero n then m else f (pred n) (succ m)

Since \f is the definition of the function, you can write the above as:

add = (\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else add (pred n) (succ m))

And the applications:

add = (\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else add (pred n) (succ m))
add 1 2
(\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else add (pred n) (succ m)) 1 2

Replacing the outermost variable with the innermost argument (in this case, n by 1):

((**\n**.\m.if (isZero n) then m else f (pred **n**) (succ m)) **1**) 2
(\m.if (isZero 1) then m else add (pred 1) (succ m)) 2

Resolving it a bit:

(\m.if (isZero 1) then m else add **(pred 1)** (succ m)) 2
(\m.if (isZero 1) then m else add 0 (succ m)) 2

Applying the second argument, and resolving:

(**\m**.if (isZero 1) then **m** else add 0 (succ **m**)) **2**
(if (isZero 1) then 2 else add 0 (succ 2))
(if (isZero 1) then 2 else add 0 **(succ 2)**)
(if (isZero 1) then 2 else add 0 3)

We know (isZero 1) is false; so, we solve the above expression and have the resulting:

(if **(isZero 1)** then 2 else add 0 3)
(if False then 2 else add 0 3)
add 0 3

Which is the same as of applying 0 to function f, and then, 3 to the result. The above expression may be read as: "f" is: 0 applied to "f", and 3 applied to the result of the former application.

But f's been defined formerly as:

(\f.\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else f (pred n) (succ m))

So, in this case, you'd have:

add = (\f.\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else f (pred n) (succ m))

add 0 3 = \n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else add (pred n) (succ m)) 0 3
    = **\n**.\m.if (isZero **n**) then m else add (pred **n**) (succ m)) **0** 3
    = \m.if (isZero 0) then m else add (pred 0) (succ m)) 3
    = **\m**.if (isZero 0) then **m** else add (pred 0) (succ **m**)) **3**
    = if (isZero 0) then 3 else add (pred 0) (succ 3))
    = if **(isZero 0)** then 3 else add (pred 0) (succ 3))
    = if True then 3 else add (pred 0) (succ 3))
    = 3

In the syntax tree you would simply show the expansions, reaching the result 3.

As a more straightforward example of the application process, considering the function "sum", defined as (\x.\y.x + y), the result of (sum 3 2) would be:

(sum 3 2)
((sum 3) 2)
(((sum) 3) 2)
(((\x.\y.x + y) 3) 2)
((\y.3 + y) 2)
(3 + 2)
5

There's no restraint on the order one solves the expressions; lambda calculus is proved to have the same result what ever may be the order of the reductions used. See ref.

As pointed out by Giorgio, Y is a fixed point combinator, that allows you to stop iterating at a certain point, if you're applications return to the same expression.

Since the application requires a finite number of iterations, the solution would be the same, simply noting the fixed pointer combination mark:

Y = (\f.\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else f (pred n) (succ m))
Y add = (\f.\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else f (pred n) (succ m)) add
Y add = (**\f**.\n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else **f** (pred n) (succ m)) **add**
Y add = \n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else add (pred n) (succ m)

Y add 0 3 = \n.\m.if (isZero n) then m else add (pred n) (succ m)) 0 3
    = **\n**.\m.if (isZero **n**) then m else add (pred **n**) (succ m)) **0** 3
    = \m.if (isZero 0) then m else add (pred 0) (succ m)) 3
    = **\m**.if (isZero 0) then **m** else add (pred 0) (succ **m**)) **3**
    = if (isZero 0) then 3 else add (pred 0) (succ 3))
    = if **(isZero 0)** then 3 else add (pred 0) (succ 3))
    = if True then 3 else add (pred 0) (succ 3))
    = 3

Reference to fixed point combinator.

share|improve this answer
1  
Shouldn't Y be the / a fix point combinator? Y = λf·(λx·f (x x)) (λx·f (x x)) –  Giorgio Nov 21 '12 at 10:07
    
Yes, Y is a fixed point combinator; I've revised the applications, and the initial equation solves up; I'll add the Y in the applications, but once the function doesn't diverge, the result will be the same. Thanks for your comment! Best regards! –  Rubens Nov 21 '12 at 10:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.