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def count_chars(s):
    '''Return a dict that contains each character in str s as a key. The
    value associated with each key is the number of times that character
    occurs in s.'''

    d = {}
    for ch in s:
       if ch in d:
          d[ch] += 1
       else:
          d[ch] = 1
    return d

I don't get the 3rd line in the code, "if ch in d". Why would the character be in the dictionary if it does not have any entries in the dic yet?

Also, I don't get what d[ch] += 1 is supposed to mean, and why there would be an else statement. Can someone please help me?

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2  
It seems like you almost don't understand python on a basic level.. The basic theory is, count the occurrences of each letter. If we have found that char before, we increase it's value by 1, to signify another encounter. If not, we set it to 1, signifying 1 encounter. Think about it, it's not hard. –  DanRedux Apr 23 '12 at 2:18
    
Thanks for the explanation, Dan. –  alicew Apr 23 '12 at 2:25
    
You may want to go through some videos to get an understanding of Python dictionaries, and Python in general. Here is one resource: code.google.com/edu/languages/google-python-class –  ajmartin Apr 23 '12 at 2:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to understand code like this is to add prints to see what it is actually doing. So,

def count_chars(s):
    '''Return a dict that contains each character in str s as a key. The
    value associated with each key is the number of times that character
    occurs in s.'''

    d = {}
    for ch in s:
       if ch in d:
          print('{} is in d'.format(ch))
          d[ch] += 1
       else:
          print('{} is NOT in d'.format(ch))
          d[ch] = 1
      print('d is now: {}'.format(d))
    return d

count_chars('abcdaaaa')

tells you:

a is NOT in d
d is now: {'a': 1}
b is NOT in d
d is now: {'a': 1, 'b': 1}
c is NOT in d
d is now: {'a': 1, 'c': 1, 'b': 1}
d is NOT in d
d is now: {'a': 1, 'c': 1, 'b': 1, 'd': 1}
a is in d
d is now: {'a': 2, 'c': 1, 'b': 1, 'd': 1}
a is in d
d is now: {'a': 3, 'c': 1, 'b': 1, 'd': 1}
a is in d
d is now: {'a': 4, 'c': 1, 'b': 1, 'd': 1}
{'a': 4, 'c': 1, 'b': 1, 'd': 1}
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Oh, I didn't think about print. Thanks for you reply! –  alicew Apr 23 '12 at 2:50

Because each time you go through the loop, you're either adding or updating keys in the dictionary. If the key already exists, you're updating its value.

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Why are we able to update the dictionary if we made an empty dict in the beginning of the code? –  alicew Apr 23 '12 at 2:18
    
Because it's only going to be empty on the first pass through the loop. It's assumed that you're going to be iterating through the loop more than one time. It's of course possible that 's' only contains one character, in which case the if/else is unnecessary. But this function is written to handle s with length >=0 –  AJ. Apr 23 '12 at 2:19
    
You've initialized an empty dict at the beginning of the code, but python allows you to dynamically add and remove elements from the dictionary. –  Michael Apr 23 '12 at 2:20
    
So in the first pass through the loop, I guess it's going to skip the if statement and go straight to the else statement since we haven't encountered the ch before? –  alicew Apr 23 '12 at 2:21
    
@alicew - you got it! –  AJ. Apr 23 '12 at 2:23

Unlike many other scripting languages, Python does not auto-create elements. In the docs you will see the methods getdefault() and setdefault(), which can be useful for situations like this. You can also subclass dict as described in this thread.

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Thank you for your reply! –  alicew Apr 23 '12 at 2:26

I don't get the 3rd line in the code, "if ch in d".

It means exactly what it says: it checks if ch is in d.

Why would the character be in the dictionary if it does not have any entries in the dic yet?

Because it may, eventually. The code is inside a for loop, and the point of a loop is to arrange for code to run many times. Some of these runs put things into the dictionary.

Also, I don't get what d[ch] += 1 is supposed to mean

It means what the language reference says it means.

and why there would be an else statement.

Because there is something we want to do when the condition isn't true, as well as something to do when it is.

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