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If you have a parent container set to width: 100% and you have sections within that are all supposed to be equal, but the percentage is an odd number, like 16.666667%, how do you ensure it displays correctly with no breaks? What's the limit to decimal places?

Example: You have

<ul>
     <li>One
     <li>Two
     <li>Three
     <li>Four
     <li>Five
     <li>Six
</ul>

and the ul has a width of 100%, all the li are floated left. Now dividing 100 by 6 you get 16.66666666667%. If i wanted a border-right: 1px solid black; how do you factor these things in with the CSS? I can understand it's all math, but you can't minus 1px from a percentage (as far as I can imagine, maybe you can...)

So how do you do these things? Thanks!

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If you are looking at that kind of precision, I think css isn't for you.. –  SiGanteng Apr 23 '12 at 2:19
    
These things are a pain, especially if you factor in padding and borders and stuff. You can't really get good precision with CSS. Does it have to be css2 compliant, or are you able to use css3 flexible box layout? –  Faris M Apr 23 '12 at 2:20
    
I can use css3. That's what I'm using now anyway. I would like to keep it javascript free. Not that I'm against javascript but I'm not the best and so writing custom code to do what I want isn't as ideal as doing it in css. –  o_O Apr 23 '12 at 2:50
    
My solution was just to add a div around every element. I wasn't actually using an ul in my example but I thought that to be the best representation and honestly I forgot i wasn't use a list. So I have <nav> <div><p><a>1</a></div> <div><p><a>2</a></div> ... <div><p><a>6</a></div> </nav> –  o_O Apr 23 '12 at 4:10
    
And then made the div widths all 16.666666666666667%. I still don't know the limit but I can't tell any problems and there is no extra space. The benefit of this solution is that now on the p i can add as much border size, padding, etc without affecting the div parent containers. Without the all powerful "proper" box-model, this wouldn't have been a problem but we get what we ask for. The flex box isn't compatible all around and still requires a fallback, which would put me in the same position. –  o_O Apr 23 '12 at 4:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hey i think you want this you can define your ul display:table and define you ul li to display:table-cell; as like this

Css

div{
width:500px;
    border:solid 1px red;
    margin:0 auto;

}

ul{
width:100%;
    background:green;
    display:table;

}

ul li{
display:table-cell;
    border-right:solid 1px white;
    padding:10px;
}
ul li:last-child{border:none;}
​

HTML

<div>
<ul>
    <li>One</li>
     <li>Two</li>
     <li>Three</li>
     <li>Four</li>
     <li>Five</li>
     <li>Six</li>
</ul>
</div>
​

Live demo http://jsfiddle.net/rohitazad/gjutz/1/

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