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  • How do I view commits that are about to be pushed?

  • I'd made a local commit. Pull a change. And no it requires a merge. I prefer not to merge and would like to undo the commit, Pull, Update changes, Then commit again.

How do I do it since rollback only undo the last command which is pull?

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@pst, that's not true. hg rollback (a very dangerous command) undoes the last command that modified the repository, be it a commit, a pull, or a etc. –  Ry4an Apr 23 '12 at 13:59
    
@Ry4an thanks. understand that. was explaining in my in scenario :) –  resting Apr 25 '12 at 1:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • How do I view commits that are about to be pushed?

Use hg outgoing. That shows what hg push would have sent to the server. The opposite command is hg incoming, which shows what hg pull would have retrieved.

  • I'd made a local commit. Pull a change. And no it requires a merge. I prefer not to merge and would like to undo the commit, Pull, Update changes, Then commit again.

Like Mark says, you're looking for the rebase extension. Enable it with

[extensions]
rebase =

in your config file and then run

$ hg pull
$ hg rebase

to move your local work (this can be multiple changesets, not just a single as in your work around!) on top of the changesets you just pulled down.

How do I do it since rollback only undo the last command which is pull?

Please don't use hg rollback as a general undo mechanism. It's a low-level command that should not be used as much as it is, especially not by new users. The rollback command removes the last transaction from the repository — a transaction in Mercurial is typically the last changeset you made or the last changesets (plural) you pulled into the repository.

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What is the recommended command to undo a mistake in preference of rollback then? –  resting Apr 25 '12 at 1:12
    
@resting: Like Mark and I wrote, you can use the rebase extension to move a committed change "on top" of the changesets you've pulled down. But don't think of committing before pulling as a mistake! It's perfectly normal behavior in all DVCS to commit locally, pull, and then merge. That should be your default until you understand why and when rebase can help you. –  Martin Geisler Apr 25 '12 at 5:56

That's really the way Mercurial works, and you shouldnt fight it in the name of a straight linear history, but there are tools that can edit history. Enable the rebase extension and just run hg rebase after your pull. It will move your local commit to the tip automatically in the simple case you described.

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is exactly right here. A DVCS that looks like a braid is a mark of a DVCS user that understands and embraces his or her tools' strengths. Merging is coding, and skipping it is falsifying history. –  Ry4an Apr 23 '12 at 14:00
    
I see...if I'm not wrong git was able to 'uncommit' with reset and move all changes back to its modified state. That allows a pull and avoids an unnecessary merge (in my opinion since my commits could just go on top of the pulled changes). Makes the history cleaner. –  resting Apr 25 '12 at 1:10
    
Cleaner, but inaccurate. A merge still happened...it is just hidden. –  Mark Tolonen Apr 25 '12 at 1:44
    
@resting: Yes, you can get a more straight-line history that way. The rebase extension allows you to obtain the same straight-line history in Mercurial. The same in Git, for that matter: it's also not recommended to git reset before every git pull. Instead you git commit (as much as you want!) and then git rebase -i later, if you like. –  Martin Geisler Apr 25 '12 at 5:59
    
hmm...alright. i'll get myself familiar into this flow of rebasing. thanks :) –  resting May 14 '12 at 0:58

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