Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm working on a fairly complex object in JS and I'm running into issues:

I have the following (abridged) code:

var LocationSelector;

LocationSelector = function(container) {
  this.selectors = {
    container: container,
    city_name: container.find('input.city_name'),
    city_id: container.find('input.city_id')
  };
  return this.initialize();
};

LocationSelector.prototype = {
  initialize: function() {
    return this.city.checkStatus();
  },
  city: {
    status: null,
    message: null,
    id: null,
    checkStatus: function() {
      if (LocationSelector.selectors.city_name.val() && LocationSelector.selectors.city_id.val()) {
        return LocationSelector.city.setStatus('success');
      }
    },
    setStatus: function(status) {
      return alert(status);
    }
  }
};

Two questions:

1) Inside of a sub-object function this no longer refers back to the root object. It seems I can refer back to the parent if I write out LocationSelector.object.method( args ), but that's a lot to type. Is there a way to define a shortcut back to the parent object?

2) In some situations I need to have several instances of this per page, so it's important to me that I can set the various selectors when a new object is instantiated and then refer to the instance selectors in the prototype. Is referring to the parent object (ie. LocationSelector) in sub-object methods even viable for that? How does JS know to stay with the currently active object's stored properties?

Basically, I'm trying to implement a class, and I'm totally new to JS and don't really know how to do it. So, any help or suggestions are appreciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are many things wrong with your current approach. Here is something closer to what you want, although I do not understand why LocationSelector instances have a city member.

function LocationSelector(container) {
  this.selectors = {
    container: container,
    city_name: container.find("input.city_name"),
    city_id: container.find("input.city_id")
  };

  this.city = new City(this);
  this.city.checkStatus();
}

function City(locationSelector) {
  this.status = null;
  this.message = null;
  this.id = null;
  this.locationSelector = locationSelector;
}

City.prototype.checkStatus = function () {
  if (this.locationSelector.selectors.city_name.val() && this.locationSelector.selectors.city_id.val()) {
    this.setStatus("success");
  }
};

City.prototype.setStatus = function () {
  alert("status");
};

Things to note:

  1. Data properties go on the instance, not the prototype. Only methods go on the prototype.
  2. City is clearly its own class, so you should make it one. In your code, a single city is being shared between all instances of LocationSelector, since it is put on the prototype. In this code, it is assigned as an instance property, in the LocationSelector constructor.
  3. You cannot reference LocationSelector.selectors like you do in your example. LocationSelector.selectors would be for "static" properties, which LocationSelector does not have. Instead you need to refer to the selectors property on specific instances; in this example, that instance is given by this.locationSelector.
  4. Points 2 and 3 speak to an important fact: the "child" City instance cannot reference to properties of the "parent" LocationSelector class without having a concrete instance of it.

Here is a version of the code that makes more sense to me, removing the part where LocationSelector has a city property (which it doesn't use).

function LocationSelectors(container) {
  this.city_name = container.find("input.city_name");
  this.city_id = container.find("input.city_id");
}

function City(locationSelectors) {
  this.locationSelector = locationSelector;
}

City.prototype.checkStatus = function () {
  if (this.locationSelectors.city_name.val() && this.locationSelectors.city_id.val()) {
    this.setStatus("success");
  }
};

City.prototype.setStatus = function () {
  alert("status");
};

function checkCityStatus(container) {
  var locationSelectors = new LocationSelectors(container);
  var city = new City(locationSelectors);

  city.checkStatus();
}

I leave you with a link to Crockford's "Private Members in JavaScript", which talks about doing OO in JavaScript. There are other, probably better explanations out there, but at least that one will put you on the right track.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason for the City member is that this handler needs to do a whole lot of stuff, so in my original use case (only ever 1 handler per page) I found it easier to create this as an object literal with many nested properties so I could do things like: LocationSelector.city.setStatus(...) and LocationSelector.district.changeName(...) and LocationSelector.errorMessages.display(...)... and so on. Each sub-object was related to a chunk of the DOM, each of the pieces interacts with the others, and LocationSelector is really like a namespace that binds them together... –  Andrew Apr 23 '12 at 14:13
    
... Now that I have a situation where I need more than one per page I have to learn how to do it with handler objects that can behave as distinct instances. I'm a total newbie when it comes to JS so this is really stretching what I know. Anyway, your answer is extraordinarily helpful and shows exactly what I needed: both a basic patch showing how my code is broken and a recommendation for a smarter approach. Thank you very much, if I could give you 5 upvotes I would. –  Andrew Apr 23 '12 at 14:15

Read about Closures and I'm positive you will find what you need.

Here's is a quick example of what you are trying to accomplish:

function MyCoolObject(name){
   var self_myCoolObject = this;
   this.name = name;
   this.popAlertWithNameInFiveSeconds = function(){
       setTimeout(function(){
         alert('Incorrect reference to name "this.name" returns ' + this.name);
         alert('Correct reference to name "self_myCoolObject.name" returns ' + self_myCoolObject.name);
       },5000)
   }
}

//TO TEST
var MyObj = new MyCoolObject('MySuperCoolName')
MyObj.popAlertWithNameInFiveSeconds();
share|improve this answer

Here is a snippet of JS code that I have. Before I drop down into a click handler, I make a reference to the object (SlideShow) by calling var parent = this. Then in later nested functions, you can be sure you're calling the right scope by using parent.function()

/* Slide Show object */
function SlideShow(parentContainerId) {

    this.BEGINNING  = 'Beginning';
    this.END        = 'End of list';
    this.FIRSTINDEX = 0;

    this.length     = jQuery(parentContainerId + ' img').length;
    this.container  = jQuery(parentContainerId);
    this.imgs       = jQuery(parentContainerId + ' img');
    this.index      = this.FIRSTINDEX;
    this.status     = 'beginning';           // beginning, end



    this.init = function() {
        // get it started
        this.moveTo(this.FIRSTINDEX);
        this.process();

        // ****GET OBJECT SCOPE*****
        var parent      = this;

        // set up click listener
        this.container.find('img').click(function(e) {
            var item_width = jQuery(this).width();
            var x_click_ps = e.clientX - jQuery(this).offset().left;
            var x_diff     = x_click_ps / item_width;




            console.log(this);
            if (x_diff < .5) {
                parent.moveByIncrement(-1)
                parent.process();
            } else {
                parent.moveByIncrement(1);
                parent.process();
            }

        });
    }


.
.
.
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.