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I am attempting to write a function which takes a large number as input (upwards of 800 digits long) and returns a simple formula of no complex math as a string.

By simple math, I mean just numbers with +,-,*,/,^ and () as needed.

'4^25+2^32' = giveMeMath(1125904201809920); // example

Any language would do. I can refactor it, just looking for some help with the logic.

Bonus. The shorter the output the better. Processing time is important. Also, mathematical accuracy is a must.

Update: to clarify, all input values will be positive integers (no decimals)

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Is there some criterion that you need the formula to use? There are infnitely many expressions that will evaluate to a given number. –  kindall Apr 23 '12 at 4:12
    
Lisp is great for dealing with large numbers. If you want an "elegant" representation of a number, you could compute a bunch of different representations using separate, complicated algorithms, then choose the shortest one. –  NeuroFuzzy Apr 23 '12 at 4:14
    
Your problem sounds similar to compressing a large number of bits. I would look into how common compression algorithms work. –  Mike Samuel Apr 23 '12 at 4:15
    
Is your intention to be able to shorten the length of the representation of the number? –  gnibbler Apr 23 '12 at 4:18
2  
@conductr, you won't be able to achieve compression for arbitrary numbers. Multiplication and addition are not going to give you any compression - only exponentation, and you can only apply that for a relatively small fraction of numbers. –  gnibbler Apr 23 '12 at 4:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is my attempt in Python:

def give_me_math(n): 

    if n % 2 == 1:
        n = n - 1  # we need to make every odd number even, and add back one later
        odd = 1
    else:
        odd = 0
    exps = []

    while n > 0:
        c = 0
        num = 0
        while num <= n/2:
            c += 1
            num = 2**c

        exps.append(c)    
        n = n - num
    return (exps, odd)

Results:

>>> give_me_math(100)
([6, 5, 2], 0)  #2**6 + 2**5 + 2**2 + 0 = 100

>>> give_me_math(99)
([6, 5, 1], 1)  #2**6 + 2**5 + 2**1 + 1 = 99

>>> give_me_math(103) 
([6, 5, 2, 1], 1) #2**6 + 2**5 + 2**2 + 2**1 + 1 = 103

I believe the results are accurate, but I am not sure about your other criteria.

Edit:

Result: Calculates in about a second.

>>> give_me_math(10**100 + 3435)
([332, 329, 326, 323, 320, 319, 317, 315, 314, 312, 309, 306, 304, 303, 300, 298, 295, 294, 289, 288, 286, 285, 284, 283, 282, 279, 278, 277, 275, 273, 272, 267, 265, 264, 261, 258, 257, 256, 255, 250, 247, 246, 242, 239, 238, 235, 234, 233, 227, 225, 224, 223, 222, 221, 220, 217, 216, 215, 211, 209, 207, 206, 203, 202, 201, 198, 191, 187, 186, 185, 181, 176, 172, 171, 169, 166, 165, 164, 163, 162, 159, 157, 155, 153, 151, 149, 148, 145, 142, 137, 136, 131, 127, 125, 123, 117, 115, 114, 113, 111, 107, 106, 105, 104, 100, 11, 10, 8, 6, 5, 3, 1], 1)

800 digit works fast too:

>>> give_me_math(10**800 + 3452)

But the output is too long to post here, which is OPs concern of course.

Time complexity here is 0(ln(n)), so it is pretty efficient.

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It's about large numbers (100 digits was the statement) so I assume this won't work. –  Sebastian Dressler Apr 23 '12 at 4:54
    
I just tested it, and it does work. –  Akavall Apr 23 '12 at 5:02
    
Thanks for showing us. –  Sebastian Dressler Apr 23 '12 at 5:33
    
@akavall this is a great start which I can add to, surely the next step is increasing the base which will reduce the output. –  conductr Apr 23 '12 at 5:39
    
@conductr yes, I think the next step is playing around with different combinations of bases to shrink the output. –  Akavall Apr 23 '12 at 15:58

I think the entire problem can be recast to a run-length encoding problem on the binary representation of the long integer.

For example, take the following number:

17976931348623159077293051907890247336179769789423065727343008115773
26758055009631327084773224075360211201138798713933576587897688144166
22492847430639474110969959963482268385702277221395399966640087262359
69162804527670696057843280792693630866652907025992282065272811175389
6392184596904358265409895975218053120L

This looks fairly horrendous. In binary, though:

>>> bin(_)
'0b11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
0000000'

Which is about 500 ones, followed by 500 zeroes. This suggests an expression like:

2**1024 - 2**512

Which is how I obtained the large number in the first place.

If there are no significantly long runs in the binary representation of the integer, this won't work well at all. 101010101010101010.... is the worst case.

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I did some brief digging around with this binary method and this was the problem I kept running into also, in practice (with random numbers) long runs are rare enough that this becomes impractical –  conductr Apr 23 '12 at 5:28
    
Arbitrary random numbers are, by definition, incompressible. An n-bit random number contains about n bits of entropy - you can't compress it any further. –  Li-aung Yip Apr 23 '12 at 5:33

In java, you should take a look at the BigDecimal class in java.math package.

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Thanks for the recommendation. Are you saying there is a build in method which already does what I need? –  conductr Apr 23 '12 at 4:14
    
BigDecimal has a lot of the operations you are asking for, but you'll have to write a parser to map your language to those methods. –  Hiro2k Apr 23 '12 at 4:16
    
I think I misunderstood your question, one thing I can say is I don't tink you can have a literal that big on your source code and expect the result to be accurate unless is a string literal. On the other hand, if the kind of function you want extracts the factors of your number randomly then it's kind of weird behavior. –  Juan Alberto López Cavallotti Apr 23 '12 at 4:20

I'd suggest you to have a look at

  1. The GMP library (The GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library) for performing the arithmetics

  2. Take a look at integer factorization. The link redirects to Wikipedia which should give probably a good overview. However to be a bit more scientific:

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