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When I do text classification, if the text is long then very satisfactory performance is obtained, using naive bayes classification.

However, when the context comes to short text, like Twitter messages or the question contents in Stackoverflow, very bad results are obtained, on almost all metrics like precision, recall, ROC...

Are there some practical suggestions that can be given to help me in classifing these short text contents?

I'd be greatful for this.

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Could you please edit your question to show the algorithm or code that you are currently using, as there may be a way to improve your implementation –  WhiteKnight Apr 23 '12 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

Improving relevance gets exponentially harder and you need to think about your end goal and work from there. But one way to get closer is to add additional metrics, which in your case would be message length, dictionary size and article context.

Assuming you prefer longer articles instead of twitter then the length metric would give higher weight to articles.

Dictionary size is most of the time related to the article length but it is also closely related to the context. That is, an article concerning a particular thing will have a high metric in that context, as opposed to an article of the same that discusses several things at once.

To build the context you would need to have a dictionary of synonyms build like a tree with distances between them. Example: software is related to computer related to electronics, but software is looser related to electronics.

To provide a solution, the quick and dirty solution would be to weigh the words from the shorter articles down.

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