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A provider (I assume it is their code) has set up a stored procedure to modify a user's SQL server password. They have used sysname types for the passed information: OLD, NEW and LOGINAME.

When they execute the command to change the password they use quotename() to bracket the text passed to the function.

Before that, while checking to see if the username exists, they pass the LOGINAME without any format control.

This has not been a problem in the past but since we have recently changed our username policy from initial+surname (FSURNAME) to firstname(dot)surname (FIRST.SURNAME) the routine crashes out. I think it is because of the lack of quotename()-style control over the username when passed to the see-if-they-exist function.

Code:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
ALTER procedure [sys].[sp_password]
  @old sysname = NULL,        -- the old (current) password
  @new sysname,               -- the new password
  @loginame sysname = NULL    -- user to change password on
as
-- SETUP RUNTIME OPTIONS / DECLARE VARIABLES --
set nocount on
declare @exec_stmt nvarchar(4000)

-- RESOLVE LOGIN NAME
if @loginame is null
    select @loginame = suser_sname()

if @new is null
    select @new = ''

-- DISALLOW USER TRANSACTION --
set implicit_transactions off
IF (@@trancount > 0)
begin
    raiserror(15002,-1,-1,'sys.sp_password')
    return (1)
end

-- CHECK IT'S A SQL LOGIN --
if not exists (select * from master.dbo.syslogins where
               loginname = @loginame and isntname = 0)
begin
    raiserror(15007,-1,-1,@loginame)
    return (1)
end

if @old is null
    set @exec_stmt = 'alter login ' + quotename(@loginame) +
        ' with password = ' + quotename(@new, '''')
else
    set @exec_stmt = 'alter login ' + quotename(@loginame) +
        ' with password = ' + quotename(@new, '''') + ' old_password = ' + quotename(@old, '''')

exec (@exec_stmt)   

if @@error <> 0
    return (1)

-- RETURN SUCCESS --
return  (0) -- sp_password

I strongly suspect that the code here:

if not exists (select * from master.dbo.syslogins where
               loginname = @loginame and isntname = 0)

is causing the issue as, as I understand it, the code is passing FIRST.LAST to the checking routine, which is then being interpreted it as an object rather than as text.

Is it possible to do the same thing but forcing text to be sent? Something like the quotename() functions being used elsewhere in the code?


EDIT:

The call that executes this stored procedure: sp_password NULL, abcdefgh, FIRST.LAST

Error received: Msg 102, Level 15, State 1, Line 1 Incorrect syntax near '.'.

When manually executed by adding the brackets (sp_password NULL, abcdefgh, [FIRST.LAST]) it of course works perfectly.

share|improve this question
    
What error do you get? Have you added the new users to SQL Server? Use SSMS and have a look in "Object Explorer - Security - Logins". If the user is not there then the password change will fail with 'FIRST.SURNAME' is not a valid login or you do not have permission.. –  Mikael Eriksson Apr 23 '12 at 5:47
    
You should not quote the name of the object looked up. loginname=@loginame is correct. And also the way they quote things in the dynamic SQL seems correct. So what is exactly the error you are seeing? –  Remus Rusanu Apr 23 '12 at 6:16
    
Original question edited. –  Lindsay Apr 23 '12 at 23:26

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