Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create an effect where h# elements are bracketed by bullet characters. If the the heading breaks across multiple lines, the bullets should be to the left and right of the text block, and vertically centred.

Take this example HTML5 and CSS3:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Title</title>
</head>

<body>
    <div class="content-container">
        <h1>Short title</h1>
        <h1>Really long title that will hopefully span multiple lines to demonstrate the problem I'm trying to solve here</h1>
    </div>
</body>

</html>

h1 {
    font-weight: bold;
    text-align: center;
}

h1:before {
    content: '— ';
}

h1:after {
    content: ' —';
}
​

This renders the bullets, but when there are line breaks the bullets end up wrapping with the text itself.

How can I change the CSS so that the bullets are placed to the left or right of the whole text block, and vertically centered against it? This jsFiddle depicts the effect better than I can describe it. Note that there are containers that exist above the header element (they just aren't exclusive containers for it) which could also be used.

I don't want to change the HTML because that's just too fragile a solution: it requires changes in the CMS templates, the content itself, and an edict to all future content authors — which will be superfluous if the theming ever changes again.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I can't see a way of doing this with text bullet points, but it can be done with background images. CSS3 supports multiple background images and multiple image positions, so we can position an image bullet point at either end of the h1 like so:

Replace your CSS with this:

body {text-align:center}

h1 {
    font-weight: bold;
    padding: 0 16px;
    background-image: url(http://www.getyourgame.net/images/BulletPointGreen.png),url(http://www.getyourgame.net/images/BulletPointGreen.png);
    background-position: left center, right center;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    display: inline-block;
}

The padding is required to make room for the bullet points. I have used some random bullet point image, but note that I have specified it twice. I can then specify different positions for these two images; one left and one right of the h1. Finally display:inline-block prevents the h1 filling the entire width, which would cause the bullet points to constantly sit at the edges of the parent element instead of at the edges of the heading text.

Hope this works for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Getting closer, but I lose the ability to keep the bullet styling consistent with the text (eg. color, shadow, size, etc). I've been playing around with table display styles too, which might have potential. Incidentally, I added a bit of info to the question regarding containers for the header elements. –  detly Apr 26 '12 at 2:29
    
Yes there are of course compromises, but I think you'll find this is the only pure css solution. –  JohnW Apr 26 '12 at 8:49
    
You might be interested in another way I found (although for all I know, it's a relatively sketchy solution). It's no big deal, really — this is just one of those silly little curiosities that got stuck in my brian. –  detly Apr 30 '12 at 13:27
    
BRAIN. STUCK IN MY BRAIN. –  detly Apr 30 '12 at 13:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I managed to get quite close with creative use of table display styling:

h1 {
    font-weight: bold;
    text-align: center;
    display: table;
    vertical-align: middle;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

h1:before {
    vertical-align: middle;
    content: '—';
    display: table-cell;
    padding-right: '1em';
}

h1:after {
    vertical-align: middle;
    content: '—';
    display: table-cell;
    padding-left: '1em';
}

Why just "quite close"? Well, firstly I haven't verified that this is standard-mandated behaviour and not just some quirk of rendering. Secondly, it works in Chrome 18 and Firefox 12, but I haven't bothered to check in Internet Explorer or Safari — and I know it doesn't work quite right in the Android browser engine.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hey that's cool. Better give yourself a green tick. It worked fine in Safari and IE9. The extra space in content:'- ' would never display, but padding seemed to work fine to achieve the same effect. –  JohnW May 3 '12 at 11:03
    
@JohnW - the space should be a non-breaking space (U+00A0), but I think it gets trimmed anyway. Padding is a better idea. –  detly May 3 '12 at 23:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.