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this program will create a father and 2 childs, there will be a chain characters, the father will fill 2 pipes, the first with the numbers, the second with the letters, the first child will read from the first pipe, and return how much numbers he got, the second son will read from the second pipe, and return how much letters he got.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

main()
{
    printf("I am the father, I will create 2 sons, the first will read the numbers , the second will read the letters\n");
    char *word="alibas123sam";

    printf("Now 2 pipes will be created\n");
    int fd1[2];
    int fd2[2];
    pipe(fd1); pipe(fd2);
    printf("Now the father will write numbers in the first pipe, and letters in the second\n");
    int i;
    char numbers[20]; int j=0;
    char caracters[20]; int k=0;
    for (i=0;i<20;i++)
    {
        if(word[i]>='0' && word[i]<='9') //if number
        {
            close(fd1[0]); //closing reading
            write(fd1[1],&word[i],1);

        }
        else
        {
            close(fd2[0]);  
            write(fd2[1],&word[i],1);
        }

    }
    printf("The father has wrote in the 2 pipes, now its time for the sons\n");
    int f=fork();
    if(f==0) //first son
    {
        for(i=0;i<20;i++) {         
            close(fd1[1]); //closing writing
            read(fd1[0],&numbers[j],1);
            j++;

        }
        printf("first son read everything, he got %d Numbers\n", j);
    }
    else
    {
        f=fork();
        if(f==0)
        {
            for(i=0;i<20;i++) {         
            close(fd2[1]); //closing writing
            read(fd2[0],&caracters[k],1);
            k++;

        }   
        printf("second son read everything, he got %d caracters\n", k);
    }
}} 

Error:

Disallowed system call: SYS_pipe
share|improve this question
    
You should check the return value from your pipe(2) calls -- they appear to be failing (for a reason that seems very odd). Where are you trying to execute this program? Is it a reasonable host or is it awkward? I'd wonder if you're confined by a mandatory access control tool such as AppArmor, SELinux, TOMOYO, or SMACK, but I doubt any would print such an odd error. –  sarnold Apr 23 '12 at 6:00
    
why do you close the descriptors? –  ShinTakezou Apr 23 '12 at 6:02
    
I am not sure this is the problem, but maybe you shouldn't close them before the fork, you can do it after you forked, if you don't need them –  ShinTakezou Apr 23 '12 at 6:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem could arise from the fact that you close the file descriptors before you fork. Rearranging your code into

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

main()
{
    printf("I am the father, I will create 2 sons, the first will read the numbers , the second will read the letters\n");
    char *word="alibas123sam";

    printf("Now 2 pipes will be created\n");
    int fd1[2];
    int fd2[2];
    pipe(fd1); pipe(fd2);
    printf("Now the father will write numbers in the first pipe, and letters in the second\n");
    int i;
    char numbers[20]; int j=0;
    char caracters[20]; int k=0;
    for (i=0;i<20;i++)
    {
        if(word[i]>='0' && word[i]<='9') //if number
        {
            close(fd1[0]); //closing reading
            write(fd1[1],&word[i],1);

        }
        else
        {
            close(fd2[0]);  
            write(fd2[1],&word[i],1);
        }

    }
    printf("The father has wrote in the 2 pipes, now its time for the sons\n");
    int f=fork();
    if(f==0) //first son
    {
        for(i=0;i<20;i++) {         
            close(fd1[1]); //closing writing
            read(fd1[0],&numbers[j],1);
            j++;

        }
        printf("first son read everything, he got %d Numbers\n", j);
    }
    else
    {
        f=fork();
        if(f==0)
        {
            for(i=0;i<20;i++) {         
            close(fd2[1]); //closing writing
            read(fd2[0],&caracters[k],1);
            k++;

        }   
        printf("second son read everything, he got %d caracters\n", k);
    }
}} 

seemed to work.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the reason: fork() is duplicating the open file descriptors, so if you close them before the fork, the child will miss the closed one. –  ShinTakezou Apr 23 '12 at 6:14

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