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I'm using Delphi 2007 and I have this case:

{ CommonUnit.pas }
type
  // there is a callback which I want to process
  TFooBar = procedure(Sender: IInterface) of object; stdcall;

  // there is an interface which is used by all modules
  IFoo = interface
  ['{0FAA4B2B-E82A-4A2A-B55F-C75EC53A1318}']
    procedure Bar(Callback: TFooBar); stdcall;
  end;

{ UnitInModuleCompiledWithoutPackages.pas }
type
  // there is a class which implements IFoo
  // and it's defined in Module One compiled without packages
  TFoo = class(TInterfacedObject, IFoo)
  public
    // implementation is ommited
    procedure Bar(Callback: TFooBar); stdcall;
  end;

{ UnitInModuleCompiledWithPackages.pas }
// there is a code in Module Two compiled with packages
type
  TSomeClass = class
  public
    // implementation is ommited
    procedure SomeMethod(Sender: IInterface); stdcall;
  end;

var
  SomeObject: TSomeClass; // assigned by somehow
  Foo: IFoo; // assigned by somehow

begin
  // ...
  Foo.Bar(SomeObject.SomeMethod); // so it is safe?
  // ...
end;

I know that it will be a memory corruption in my case when I would to try to pass an object reference in Foo.Bar if it's declared like this:

type
  IFoo = interface
  ['{0FAA4B2B-E82A-4A2A-B55F-C75EC53A1318}']
    // TSomeClass now declared in CommonUnit.pas
    procedure Bar(CallbackObject: TSomeClass); stdcall;
  end;

That is because implementation of TSomeClass in Module One is not the same as in Module Two (different memory managers and so on).
But what about a method references?
I haven't found anything in Embarcadero's documentation that might be to clear up this things.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your code is fine. When you pass around the method pointer TFooBar you are passing two pointers, a function pointer and an instance pointer. When you invoke that method, all versions of Delphi do the exact same thing to invoke the method because the calling convention enforces a precise binary interface. And all versions of Delphi represent a method pointer in the same way.

The problems that you are concerned about are:

  1. Different memory managers. No problem here because we are not doing heap allocation.
  2. Different object representation on different compilers. No problem here as invoking a method pointer does not rely on object representation. It relies on the code pointer and the data pointer (passed by value between modules) and the calling convention (agreed to be the same by convention).
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As David Heffernan already answered, using method pointers is fine. The only reasons for using any kind of "callback object" instead of a method pointer, would be if:

  • The IFoo instance might hold on to the pointer after Bar has returned, in which case the callback should better be described as an event, and you should pass in an event sink interface, which guarantees proper life time management.
  • There are multiple alternative callback methods the implementation of IFoo.Bar might call, in which case you should also consider passing in a single interface (not class instance, for the reason you state yourself) rather than multiple method pointers.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 another reason for using an interface could be that you wanted to allow interop with modules built with other than Delphi –  David Heffernan Apr 23 '12 at 7:23
    
@DavidHeffernan: Yes, in particular in 64 bit code, due to the peculiarities of the calling convention. In 32 code you could always interpret any method as a procedure with an extra Self argument. In some cases this won't work in 64 bit code, more precisely if the method is a function that returns anything that requires an implicit Result parameter (such as an interface, or any stack allocated type larger than 64 bits). –  Henrick Hellström Apr 23 '12 at 7:36
    
I don't follow your logic there with x64. It's true that you can't play the same simple thunking games with the stack under x64. But if you just declare the method as being a plain old function with an extra Self parameter, then you are good to go. I tihnk. –  David Heffernan Apr 23 '12 at 8:03
    
@DavidHeffernan: On x86, as long as both compilers support the register calling convention, you can easily convert any method into a function by adding a Self parameter. On x64 this doesn't work if the method requires an implicit Result parameter, because the implicit Self parameter for methods is always passed in rcx, while the implicit Result parameter is passed in rdx for methods but in rcx for functions. You can't code around that by replacing it with a procedure either, because the result pointer is supposed to be returned in rax. –  Henrick Hellström Apr 23 '12 at 8:08

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