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I have multiple filenames that look something like;

com.test.app1.deb

com.heavy.test.app2.deb

com.maybe-test.app3.deb

com.crazy.app-4.deb

I would like to get the bolded strings only. so far, I've got this,

name=$(echo $file | sed 's!\(*.\)\(.*\).deb!\2!')

EDIT: I have other files in the same dir that would name something like;

com.company.name_1.0.2_arm.deb

Currently, my code looks like;

for file in *.deb; do
 name=$(echo "$file" | sed 's/^.*\.\([^.][^.]*\)\.deb$/\1/')
 echo $name
done
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Since you asked the same question 2 hours later, you might as well close this one. –  glenn jackman Apr 23 '12 at 13:33
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want negative matching so you can exclude dots from the part of the string that you want to capture. I also anchored the string so that you don't get a nasty surprise on a name like com.deboop.foo.deb.

name=$(echo "$file" | sed 's/^.*\.\([^.][^.]*\)\(_[-.0-9][-.0-9]*_arm\)*\.deb$/\1/')

(edited to reflect comments)

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well done! it works! –  AlwynIsPat Apr 23 '12 at 6:47
    
apparently, there's some files that are named something like com.coy. name _0.01_arm.deb within the same dir, how about these? –  AlwynIsPat Apr 23 '12 at 7:44
    
Are the _s part of the name? Also I would suggest finding a regex resource and learning how to construct these yourself instead of relying on other people to do so for you. But as written: ^.*\([^.][^.]*\)\(_[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*_arm\)*\.deb$. –  geekosaur Apr 23 '12 at 7:55
    
i understand the basics but when it gets to these stages, it's really tough to understand, but I'm trying. :) –  AlwynIsPat Apr 23 '12 at 7:58
    
no, only the "name" is required. –  AlwynIsPat Apr 23 '12 at 8:05
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$> cat text
com.test.app1.deb
com.heavy.test.app2.deb
com.maybe-test.app3.deb
com.crazy.app-4.deb

$> sed -r "s/.*\.([^\.]*)\.deb$/\1/" ./text
app1
app2
app3
app-4
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+1 But I don't think the . needs to backslashed inside a character class. –  potong Apr 23 '12 at 11:46
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pearl.238> cat file1
com.test.app1.deb
com.heavy.test.app2.deb
com.maybe-test.app3.deb
com.crazy.app-4.deb
pearl.239> awk -F. '{print $(NF-1)}' file1
app1
app2
app3
app-4
pearl.240> 

you should use the below in your script.

name=$(echo $file |awk -F. '{print $(NF-1)}')
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