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Now that I can successfully iterate through my loop of possible valid toppings I am not able to add the 0.75 surcharge for toppings in my program. I was hoping you could tell me why that is. The program in its entirety is at the bottom. The two parts which concern me are

public class TestPizza
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    int x;
    String top[] = {"Mushrooms", "Onions", ""};
    Pizza one = new Pizza();
    Pizza two = new Pizza();
    Pizza three = new Pizza();

one.setSize(12);
one.addTopping(top);
one.showValues();

  }
}

And

// setPrice() assigns a price to the pie
public void addTopping(String programToppings[])
{
  for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++)
  {
    toppings[x] = programToppings[x];
  }
  for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++)
  {
    toppings[x] = toppings[x].toLowerCase();
  }
  for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++)
  {
    for(int xx = 0; xx < 6; xx++)
    {
      if(toppings[x].equals(validToppings[xx]))
      {price += 0.75;}
    }
  }
}

I do not see why the .equals method is not working and assigning the odd sum of change to the final price...

// This custom class is used to create Pie objects
// It stores the data about the Pie in four variables:
// size, price, type and baked
// It lets the program that creates the Pie object set these values using four methods:
// setSize, setPrice, setType and bake

public class Pizza
{

  // Declare four variables that can store the values for each pie
  // Each Pie object will have their own, separate copy of these variables 12.
    private int size;
    private double price;
    private boolean baked;
    private int x;
    private int xx;
    private String validToppings[] = new String[6];
    private String toppings[] = new String[3];


    // The "constructor" method is called when a new pie
    // object is first created. We use it to set "default" values.
    // Our typical pie is 10 inches, costs $8 and is not baked yet
    // We don't yet know what the pie filling will be
    Pizza()
    {
      size = 8;
      price = 10.0;
      baked = false;
      String validToppings[] = {"mushrooms", "pepperonis", "onions", "mushroom", "pepperoni", "onion"};
      String toppings[] = new String[3];
    }

    // showValues() is a void method that displays the values of the
    // current Pie
    public void showValues()
    {
      System.out.println("Pie Size: " + size);
      for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++) {System.out.println("With " + toppings[x]);};
      System.out.println("Price of Pie: $" + price);
    }

    // getSize() returns the size of the pie
    public int getSize()
    {
      return size;
    }
    // getPrice() returns the price of the pie
    public double getPrice()
    {
      return price;
    }
    // baked() returns whether or not the pie is baked
    public boolean getBaked()
    {
      return baked;
    }
    // setSize() assigns a size to the pie
    public void setSize(int thisSize)
    {
      size = thisSize;
      switch(size)
      {
        case 8: price = 10.00; break;
        case 12: price = 14.00; break;
        case 16: price = 18.00; break;
        default: System.out.println("Error in Pizza class: Attempt to set invalid Pizza size."); break;
      }
    }

    // setPrice() assigns a price to the pie
    public void addTopping(String programToppings[])
    {
      for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++)
      {
        toppings[x] = programToppings[x];
      }
      for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++)
      {
        toppings[x] = toppings[x].toLowerCase();
      }
      for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++)
      {
        for(int xx = 0; xx < 6; xx++)
        {
          if(toppings[x].equals(validToppings[xx]))
          {price += 0.75;}
        }
      }
    }

  public void bake()
  {
    baked = true;
  };

}
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Why not use a HashMap and make the searching and storing easy? –  Anuj Balan Apr 23 '12 at 7:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
 Pizza()
{
  size = 8;
  price = 10.0;
  baked = false;
  String validToppings[] = {"mushrooms", "pepperonis", "onions", "mushroom", "pepperoni", "onion"};
  String toppings[] = new String[3];
}

Here,

String validToppings[] = {"mushrooms", "pepperonis", "onions", "mushroom", "pepperoni", "onion"};

is local to the constructor and no way connected to the global 'validToppings[]'. Look into it.

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The validTopics instance array in Pizza is never filled. Replace

String validToppings[] = {"mushrooms", "pepperonis", "onions", "mushroom", "pepperoni", "onion"};

in Pizza's constructor with:

this.validToppings[] = {"mushrooms", "pepperonis", "onions", "mushroom", "pepperoni", "onion"};

Furthermore, there are a number of strange things in your code:

  • addTopping is fairly inefficient regarding the iteration over the toppings
  • addTopping uses a (IMO) magic number in the for loops => 3
  • you initialize the arrays in Pizza twice
  • the way you initialize and validate the different toppings is confusing
share|improve this answer
    
This may be the ticket. Thanks for the pointer brother. Let me try this and compile and post the results!! –  user1251814 Apr 23 '12 at 6:44

Your validToppings array is empty. You are comparing each String to null.

You are declaring members of Pizza this way:;

private String validToppings[] = new String[6];
private String toppings[] = new String[3];

and you're trying to assign a value in the constructor this way

String validToppings[] = {"mushrooms", "pepperonis", "onions", "mushroom", "pepperoni", "onion"};
String toppings[] = new String[3];

But everything the code above from the constructor does is creating a new local variable which will be forgot after the execution of the constructor is done.

The fix is to assign a value to the members. For instance, one possible proper solution would be the following:

  • Declare members like this: String[] validToppings;
  • And assign a value in the constructor like this: validToppings = {"mushroooms", ... };

From the design point of view (you might be a beginner, but still worthy to mention) you should be using enumerations (would save you comparing strings, making typos, ...).

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