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Assume that this is a ServiceContract

[ServiceContract]
public interface MyService
{
    [OperationContract]
    int Sum(int x, int y);

    [OperationContract]
    int Sum(double x, double y);

}

Method overloading is allowed in C#, but WCF does not allow you to overload operation contracts The hosting program will throw an InvalidOperationException while hosting

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9  
I'm not sure this is the correct answer so I'll post as a comment. I believe it is because WCF is designed to work with as many protocols as possible, i.e. non-Microsoft technologies too. Overloading is a feature to .Net and a few other languages, but not all. To maximise the availability of services, overloading isn't allowed. (I think) –  Smudge202 Apr 23 '12 at 7:05
    
Seems like a good answer to me. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Apr 23 '12 at 7:08
    
@Sleiman nice remark slimy –  Hussein Zawawi Apr 27 '12 at 7:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 47 down vote accepted

In a nutshell, the reason you cannot overload methods has to do with the fact that WSDL does not support the same overloading concepts present inside of C#. The following post provides details on why this is not possible.

http://jeffbarnes.net/blog/post/2006/09/21/Overloading-Methods-in-WCF.aspx

To work around the issue, you can explicitly specify the Name property of the OperationContract.

[ServiceContract]
public interface MyService
{
    [OperationContract(Name="SumUsingInt")]
    int Sum(int x, int y);

    [OperationContract(Name="SumUsingDouble")]
    int Sum(double x, double y);
}
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Because when invoking over HTTP/SOAP, having the same method name in your contract would mean that there's no way to determine which particular method the client is about to invoke.

Remember that when invoking web methods over http, arguments are optional and are initialized with default values if missing. This means that invocation of both methods could look exactly the same way over HTTP/SOAP.

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