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I have a link button inside a <td> which I have to disable. This works on IE but not working in Firefox and Chrome. Structure is - Link inside a <td>. I cannot add any container in the <td> (like div/span)

I tried all the following but not working on Firefox (using 1.4.2 js):

$(td).children().each(function () {
        $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled');
  });


  $(td).children().attr('disabled', 'disabled');

  $(td).children().attr('disabled', true);

  $(td).children().attr('disabled', 'true');

Note - I cannot de-register the click function for the anchor tag as it is registered dynamically. AND I HAVE TO SHOW THE LINK IN DISABLED MODE.

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

You can't disable a link (in a portable way). You can use one of these techniques (each one with its own benefits and disadvantages).

CSS way

This should be the right way (bust see later) to do it when most of browsers will support it:

a.disabled {
    pointer-events: none;
}

Actually (2016) it's well supported only by Chrome, FireFox and Opera (only latest versions). Internet Explorer started to support this from version 11 but not for links however it's available in an outer element like span.disabled-links { pointer-events: none; }, note that this may be a portable solution if you need to support IE and you can change your HTML but it won't disable keyboard events (more about this later).

Workaround

We, probably, need to define a CSS class for pointer-events: none but what if we reuse the disabled attribute instead of a CSS class? Strictly speaking disabled is not supported for <a> but browsers won't complain for unknown attributes. Using the disabled attribute IE will ignore pointer-events but it will honor IE specific disabled attribute; other CSS compliant browsers will ignore unknown disabled attribute and honor pointer-events. Easier to write than to explain:

a[disabled] {
    pointer-events: none;
}

All this said please note that pointer-events disables only...pointer events. Links will still be navigable through keyboard then you also need to apply one of the other techniques described here.

Intercept clicks

Use a href to a JavaScript function, check for the condition (or the disabled attribute itself) and do nothing in case.

$("td > a").on("click", function(event){
    if ($(this).is("[disabled]")) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});

To disable links do this:

$("td > a").attr("disabled", "disabled");

To re-enable them:

$("td > a").removeAttr("disabled");

If you want instead of .is("[disabled]") you may use .attr("disabled") != undefined (jQuery 1.6+ will always return undefined when the attribute is not set) but is() is much more clear (thanks to Dave Stewart for this tip). Please note here I'm using the disabled attribute in a non-standard way, if you care about this then replace attribute with a class and replace .is("[disabled]") with .hasClass("disabled") (adding and removing with addClass() and removeClass()).

Clear the link

Clear the href attribute. With this code you do not add an event handler but you change the link itself. Use this code to disable links:

$("td > a").each(function() {
    this.data("href", this.attr("href"))
        .attr("href", "javascript:void(0)")
        .attr("disabled", "disabled");
});

And this one to re-enable them:

$("td > a").each(function() {
    this.attr("href", this.data("href")).removeAttr("disabled");
});

Personally I do not like this solution very much (if you do not have to do more with disabled links) but it may be more compatible because of various way to follow a link.

Fake click handler

Add/remove an onclick function where you return false, link won't be followed. To disable links:

$("td > a").attr("disabled", "disabled").on("click", function() {
    return false; 
});

To re-enable them:

$("td > a").removeAttr("disabled").off("click");

I do not think there is a reason to prefer this solution instead of the first one.

Styling

Styling is even more simple, whatever solution you're using to disable the link we did add a disabled attribute so you can use following CSS rule:

a[disabled] {
    color: gray;
}

If you're using a class instead of attribute:

a.disabled {
    color: gray;
}

Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA)

Do not forget to also include an attribute aria-disabled="true" together with disabled attribute/class.

share|improve this answer
2  
Right. But for easier maintenance I would add click event handlers to all td as that might be disabled, which will call event.preventDefault() if $(this).data('disabled') is true, and then set data('disabled', true) to any link I want to disable (false to enable, etc.) – ori Apr 23 '12 at 7:15
    
@ori Yes, good solution! – Adriano Repetti Apr 23 '12 at 7:31
1  
@Ankit For appearance you have CSS! Set-up a rule for 'disabled' links like this a[disabled] { color: gray } – Adriano Repetti Apr 23 '12 at 8:59
1  
Quick update on browser-support. Note even though IE11 supports pointer-events, there is a small tidbit that says it doesn't work on links :(... – aug Oct 23 '14 at 20:16
1  
$(this).is('[disabled]') might be a nicer way to detect the disabled attribute – Dave Stewart Feb 3 '15 at 18:05
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Got the fix in css.

td.disabledAnchor a{
       pointer-events: none !important;
       cursor: default;
       color:Gray;
}

Above css when applied to the anchor tag will disable the click event.

For details checkout this link

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a nice solution but it's not supported by...guess...Internet Explorer. – Adriano Repetti Apr 23 '12 at 14:32
    
Its supported by all browsers – Ankit May 2 '12 at 6:56
1  
It shouldn't be supported for HTML in Internet Explorer and Opera. – Adriano Repetti May 2 '12 at 7:18
    
I have checked and it works on all browsers – Ankit May 9 '13 at 14:36
1  
Check this table: caniuse.com/pointer-events – Adriano Repetti May 9 '13 at 15:11

Thanks to everyone that posted solutions, I combined multiple approaches to provide some more advanced disabled functionality. Here is a gist, and the code is below.

This provides for multiple levels of defense so that Anchors marked as disable actually behave as such.
Using this approach, you get an anchor that you cannot:
  - click
  - tab to and hit return
  - tabbing to it will move focus to the next focusable element
  - it is aware if the anchor is subsequently enabled


1.  Include this css, as it is the first line of defense.  This assumes the selector you use is 'a.disabled'
    a.disabled {
      pointer-events: none;
      cursor: default;
    }

 2. Next, instantiate this class such as (with optional selector):
    $ ->
      new AnchorDisabler()

Here is the coffescript class:

class AnchorDisabler
  constructor: (selector = 'a.disabled') ->
    $(selector).click(@onClick).keyup(@onKeyup).focus(@onFocus)

  isStillDisabled: (ev) =>
    ### since disabled can be a class or an attribute, and it can be dynamically removed, always recheck on a watched event ###
    target = $(ev.target)
    return true if target.hasClass('disabled')
    return true if target.attr('disabled') is 'disabled'
    return false

  onFocus: (ev) =>
    ### if an attempt is made to focus on a disabled element, just move it along to the next focusable one. ###
    return unless @isStillDisabled(ev)

    focusables = $(':focusable')
    return unless focusables

    current = focusables.index(ev.target)
    next = (if focusables.eq(current + 1).length then focusables.eq(current + 1) else focusables.eq(0))

    next.focus() if next


  onClick: (ev) =>
    # disabled could be dynamically removed
    return unless @isStillDisabled(ev)

    ev.preventDefault()
    return false

  onKeyup: (ev) =>

    # 13 is the js key code for Enter, we are only interested in disabling that so get out fast
    code = ev.keyCode or ev.which
    return unless code is 13

    # disabled could be dynamically removed
    return unless @isStillDisabled(ev)

    ev.preventDefault()
    return false
share|improve this answer

Try the element:

$(td).find('a').attr('disabled', 'disabled');

Disabling a link works for me in Chrome: http://jsfiddle.net/KeesCBakker/LGYpz/.

Firefox doesn't seem to play nice. This example works:

<a id="a1" href="http://www.google.com">Google 1</a>
<a id="a2" href="http://www.google.com">Google 2</a>

$('#a1').attr('disabled', 'disabled');

$(document).on('click', 'a', function(e) {
    if ($(this).attr('disabled') == 'disabled') {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
});

Note: added a 'live' statement for future disabled / enabled links.
Note2: changed 'live' into 'on'.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not work in Firefox. – Ankit Apr 23 '12 at 8:10
4  
The new example should work in Firefox as well. ;-) it's a firefix :D – Kees C. Bakker Apr 23 '12 at 8:20
    
Chrome prevents navigation in jsFiddle due to "Refused to display document because display forbidden by X-Frame-Options." Sorry if the jsfiddle example does weird things ;-) – Kees C. Bakker Apr 23 '12 at 8:26
    
I have to show the anchor tag as disabled also. Same as is shown in IE. Plus i dont want to modify the click function to place a check if it is disabled – Ankit Apr 23 '12 at 8:29
    
The show-part can be done by css and adding a class that makes it grayed out. The advantage of the 'live' click is that you'll fix the problem for all links. If I can help more, just let me know. Hope you'll succeed. – Kees C. Bakker Apr 23 '12 at 8:36

I would do something like

$('td').find('a').each(function(){
 $(this).addClass('disabled-link');
});

$('.disabled-link').on('click', false);

something like this should work. You add a class for links you want to have disabled and then you return false when someone click them. To enable them just remove the class.

share|improve this answer
    
This would not help. I have to re-register the click event and the function is dynamic which is called. Once removed, I cannot associate it back – Ankit Apr 23 '12 at 8:11

I have to disable the link through angularjs.. I tried below code snnipet but its not working .. After inspecting element in chrome, I found that no click event handler added to this anchor tag..

angular.element(element).attr("disabled", "disabled").on("click", function(event) {
                                    if ($(this).is("[disabled]")) {
                                        event.preventDefault();
                                    }
                                });

I also tried the angularjs bind method to achieve this but it also didn't work..

angular.element(element).bind("click", function(event) {
                                    event.preventDefault();
                                });

Is it the issue of Jqlite ? I found below info on angularjs website about "on" and "bind" methods.

bind() - Does not support namespaces, selectors or eventData

on() - Does not support namespaces, selectors or eventData

share|improve this answer

you cannot disable a link, if you want that click event should not fire then simply Remove the action from that link.

$(td).find('a').attr('href', '');

For More Info :- Elements that can be Disabled

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1  
This doesn't really disable the link. The anchor element will still trigger, even though it will remain on the same page. – Florian Margaine Apr 23 '12 at 7:22

Use the attribute disabled directly in html5.

<a disabled href="your_link_here">This is a disabled link</a>
share|improve this answer
    
This is not standar, and the question already says that he tried this – rekiem87 Jan 13 at 18:56

You can use this to disabled the Hyperlink of asp.net or link buttons in html.

$("td > a").attr("disabled", "disabled").on("click", function() {
    return false; 
});
share|improve this answer

I think a lot of these are over thinking. Add a class of whatever you want, like disabled_link.
Then make the css have .disabled_link { display: none }
Boom now the user can't see the link so you won't have to worry about them clicking it. If they do something to satisfy the link being clickable, simply remove the class with jQuery:
$("a.disabled_link").removeClass("super_disabled"). Boom done!

share|improve this answer
    
From the question: 'AND I HAVE TO SHOW THE LINK IN DISABLED MODE.' – Marcelo Nov 7 '14 at 20:45
    
Yup, you are right. I missed that. So I would say instead, move href value to data-href $("td a").each(function(i,v){ $(this).data('href',this.href); $(this).attr('href','#').css('color','grey'); }); Then when you want to undisable one: $(this).attr('href',$(this).data('href')).css('color','blue'); – Jordan Michael Rushing Nov 14 '14 at 18:05

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