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I would like to see the structure of the memory, allocated to two different variables.
The attention behind this, is to understand how the memory is structured in order of storing different datatypes.

How is it done in C++?

//how to show, whats in memory in &var1 &var2 ?
short var1 = 2;
string var2 = "bla";
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What do you mean by structure of the memory? The content stored at the address? Byte by byte? –  jogojapan Apr 23 '12 at 7:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are using Eclipse, you can use the Memory View in the debug perspective.

Either that, or simply create a pointer to your variables and inspect the contents of those:

short var1 = 2;
string var2 = "bla";

char* pVar1 = (char*)&var1; //point to memory storing var1
char* pVar2 = (char*)&var2; //point to memory storing var2
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I usually use something like the following:

template< typename T >
class Dump
{
public:
    explicit            Dump( T const& obj ) ;
    void                print( std::ostream& dest ) const ;

    friend std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& dest, Dump const& source )
    {
        source.print( dest );
        return source;
    }

private:
    unsigned char const*myObj ;
} ;

template< typename T >
inline Dump< T >
dump(
    T const&            obj )
{
    return Dump< T >( obj ) ;
}

template< typename T >
Dump< T >::Dump(
    T const&            obj )
    :   myObj( reinterpret_cast< unsigned char const* >( &obj ) )
{
}

template< typename T >
void
Dump< T >::print(
    std::ostream&       dest ) const
{
    IOSave              saver( dest ) ;
    dest.fill( '0' ) ;
    dest.setf( std::ios::hex, std::ios::basefield ) ;
    char const*         baseStr = "" ;
    if ( (dest.flags() & std::ios::showbase) != 0 ) {
        baseStr = "0x" ;
        dest.unsetf( std::ios::showbase ) ;
    }
    unsigned char const* const
                        end = myObj + sizeof( T ) ;
    for ( unsigned char const* p = myObj ; p != end ; ++ p ) {
        if ( p != myObj ) {
            dest << ' ' ;
        }
        dest << baseStr << std::setw( 2 ) << (unsigned int)( *p ) ;
    }
}

IOSave is a simple class which saves the formatting state (flags, fill and precision) in the constructor, and restores them in the destructor.

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If you're using MSVS, you can open the Memory tab and write the address you wish to inspect.

You must be in debug - Debug -> Windows -> Memory.

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I am using Eclipse –  Skip Apr 23 '12 at 7:48
    
@Skip you should specify that in the question. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 23 '12 at 7:49
1  
@Luchian Grigore The question is tagged eclipse. For me that is obvious enough. –  Matthias Apr 23 '12 at 7:57
1  
@Matthias it wasn't when I answered. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 23 '12 at 8:07
    
When I created this thread I thought about C++' internal possibilities, like printf the variable's memory address. I'm glad that the IDEs provide a more casual way to solve the problem. –  Skip Apr 23 '12 at 8:21

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