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I have a thread that does several things. One of them is to just sleep for some time. After a normal sleep it calls delayFinished() method, but if the sleep is interrupted then delayFinished() should not be called. I also need a method that aborts the sleep, that may be called by other threads.

So this is the implementation that captures my intent, but I don't think it would work:

public class MyThread extends Thread {
   private boolean sleeping=false;
   private Object sleepingControl=new Object();

   //... other unrelated stuff...

   private void delay() {
      try {
          synchronized(sleepingControl) {
             sleeping=true;         
             sleep(delay);
             sleeping=false;                        
             delayFinished();
          }
      } catch (InterruptedException e) {
          sleeping=false;
      }
    }
    public void abortDelay() {
          synchronized(sleepingControl) {
             if (sleeping)          
                interrupt();
          }
    }
 }

If delay() is called, and while it's sleeping, abortDelay() is called by another thread (the main use case), abortDelay() would hang on the synchronized statement since the caller of delay() owns that monitor and has not relinquished it yet.

On the other hand, if delay is implemented this way:

   private void delay() {
      synchronized(sleepingControl) {
         sleeping=true;         
      }
      try {              
             sleep(delay);

it's possible that delay() is called, finishes the synchronized block setting sleeping to true, but then abortDelay() is called, and it would call interrupt() even though the thread has not yet started its sleep.

Can anyone suggest any improvements to these attempts?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to investigate Object.wait()/notify() instead of using sleep(). With wait() one of the crucial things is that it releases the lock on the object while waiting allowing another thread to acquire the lock and wake it up with notify().

e.g.

public class MyThread extends Thread {
   private boolean aborted = false;
   private final Object sleepingControl=new Object();

   //... other unrelated stuff...

   private void delay() {
      try {
          synchronized(sleepingControl) {
             sleepingControl.wait(delay);

             if (!aborted)
                 delayFinished();
          }
      } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      }
    }
    public void abortDelay() {
          synchronized(sleepingControl) {
             aborted = true;
             sleepingControl.notify();
          }
    }
 }

This is also not the whole story as wait() has a curious implementation quirk where it can spuriously wake up. So you need to manually loop the wait() call and if it returns check to see if the time has actually expired.

In reality I think you can achieve the above simpler with the java.util.concurrent classes. Take a look at the Lock class.

share|improve this answer
    
Is that 'synchronized' stuff necessary at all? –  Martin James Apr 23 '12 at 8:39
    
'wait() has a curious implementation quirk where it can spuriously wake up' - I suspect only on OS with synchronization primiives that don't work correctly. –  Martin James Apr 23 '12 at 8:44
    
If you call delay() more than once(from anywhere inside the class), there could be problem with knowing which of the calls should be aborted with abortDelay() method –  Zhivko Draganov Apr 23 '12 at 8:48
    
@Martin, you can't use wait/notify without the synchronized. You'll get an IllegalMonitorStateException –  Mike Q Apr 23 '12 at 14:59
    
@Martin, re the wakeup, I don't know but it's documented so one of these things we have to account for :) –  Mike Q Apr 23 '12 at 15:01

Mike Q.'s answer is the one you want. But to make your code work, make sleeping volatile and remove the synchronization from abortDelay. Then your only problem is that abortDelay might catch delay immediately before either line sleeping = false;. So after both lines, call interrupted() to clear the possible setting.

Correction/Elaboration: abortDelay needs synchronization. Code should look like this:

private final Object     sleepingControl = new Object();
private volatile boolean sleeping;

private void delay() {
    try {
        sleeping=true;  // Synching not needed.
        sleep(delay);
        // Thread COULD be interrupted at this point!
        // Now makes sure abortDelay sees this change.
        synchronized (sleepingControl)  {
            sleeping = false;
            // Thread can no longer be interrupted.
            // Clear flag if it is set.
            interrupted();
        }
        delayFinished();
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // Thread COULD be interrupted at this point!
        synchronized (sleepingControl)  {
            sleeping = false;
            // Thread can no longer be interrupted.
            // Clear flag if it is set.
            interrupted();
        }
    }
}
public void abortDelay() {
    synchronized (sleepingControl)  {
        if (sleeping)
            // At this point, "sleeping" HAS to be true.
            interrupt();
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Ralph, your answer is not clear. especially what you mean by "before either line..." but: if i remove the synchronization from abortDelay, what's the point of keeping it in delay()? also, not sure what you mean by "after both lines call interrupted()" but i think it's a problem if you call interrupt() when the thread is not interruptible (not in the sleep). so w/o the "synchronized", it's a problem if abortDelay() is called exactly before or after the sleep(). if you think you have a good fix to my code please post the fixed code. i would be interested. thanks –  inor Apr 24 '12 at 4:41
    
@inor: I got my synchronized removals wrong; you do need them in abortDelay. I'll edit my answer to include what I think is the right solution. You can always interrupt a thread; it just sets a flag. sleep sees that you have done so and throws the exception. You need to call interrupted to clear it if the thread is "interrupted" after the call to sleep. My original suggestion could interrupt your thread at any time if, say, the abortDelay thread checked sleeping, got suspended for half an hour, then called interrupt. Not Good. –  RalphChapin Apr 24 '12 at 15:03
    
@inor: I'm trying to show your solution can work. Using wait-modify is more the standard way to handle this. –  RalphChapin Apr 24 '12 at 15:06

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