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I'm trying to design some class hierarchy and I got "stuck" at this part.

Lets say that I have following classes

abstract class Video 
{
    const TYPE_MOVIE = 1;
    const TYPE_SHOW  = 2;

    abstract public function getTitle();
    abstract public function getType();
}

class Movie extends Video 
{
    // ...

    public function getType() 
    {
        return self::TYPE_MOVIE;
    }
}

class Show extends Video 
{
    // ...

    public function getType() 
    {
        return self::TYPE_SHOW;
    }
}

In the diffrent part of the system I have (Parser) class that encapsulates creation of movie and show objects and returns obj. to the client.

Question: What is the best way to get a type of a obj. returned from parser/factory class, so that client can do something like

$video = $parser->getVideo('Dumb and Dumber');

echo $video->getTitle();

// Way 1
if($video->getType == 'show') {
    echo $video->getNbOfSeasons();
}

// Way 2
if($video instanceof Show) {
    echo $video->getNbOfSeasons();
}

// Current way
if($video->getType == Video::TYPE_SHOW) {
    echo $video->getNbOfSeasons();
}

Is there a better way than my solution (read as: does my solution suck?)?

share|improve this question
2  
+1 Perfect example to Explain any Question... – OM The Eternity Apr 23 '12 at 8:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there a better way than my solution (read as: does my solution suck?)?

Your solution does not suck, per se. However, whenever someone is trying to determine the subtype to perform some actions, I tend to wonder; why? This answer might be a little theoretical and perhaps even a little pedantic, but here goes.

You shouldn't care. The relationship between a parent and a child class is that the child class overwrites the behaviour of the parent. A parent class should always be substitutable by it's children, regardless which one. If you find yourself asking: how do I determine the subtype, you're usually doing one of two things "wrong":

  1. You're attempting to perform an action based upon subtype. Normally, one would opt for moving that action to the class itself, instead of "outside" of the class. This makes for more manageable code as well.

  2. You're attempting to fix a problem you've introduced yourself by using inheritance, where inheritance isn't warranted. If there is a parent, and there are children, each of which are to be used differently, each of which have different methods, just stop using inheritance. They're not the same type. A film is not the same a tv-serie, not even close. Sure, you can see both on your television, but the resemblance stops there.

If you're running into issue number 2, you're probably using inheritance not because it makes sense, but simply to reduce code duplication. That, in and on itself, is a good thing, but the way you're attempting to do so might not be optimal. If you can, you could use composition instead, although I have my doubts where the duplicated behaviour would be, apart from some arbitrary getters and setters.

That said, if your code works, and you're happy with it: go for it. This answer is correct in how to approach OO, but I don't know anything about the rest of your application, so the answer is generic.

share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree with you. 2. correctly points to the difference between extension and implementation. A Film & a Serie may follow a common interface to allow to be played on a TV however they may not share anything more. – Boris Guéry Apr 23 '12 at 9:22
    
@Berry Langerak The deal with this is that client requests video by passing name of a some motion picture, in the back I search/fetch/parse data and than create and populate right obj. depending on the data fetched (it can be a movie, tv show, and in the future maybe some additional type too), the thing is I don't care what type of a obj. I create, but the client who requested the obj. cares. He needs to know what methods he can call. – Marko Jovanovic Apr 23 '12 at 12:34
    
...So even if Movie and TV show don't share the same base class, client still needs to check which obj. (type of video) he got. Maybe I'll wrap the whole thing in Facade class. Anyway you made me stop and think about the whole thing from the start :) – Marko Jovanovic Apr 23 '12 at 12:34
    
@MarkoJovanovic If there are that many different methods on the objects, inheritance is the wrong tool. You simply have two different entities ;) – Berry Langerak Apr 23 '12 at 13:04

I'd go with way 2. It abstracts you the need to add another constant at Video in case you may want to add class SoapOpera extends Show (for instance).

With way #2, you are less dependent on constants. Whatever information you can gain without hardcoding it, means less problems to likely happen in the future in case you want to extend. Read about Tight an Loose Coupling.

share|improve this answer
1  
Agreed - the only upside for doing things the way he's doing them now is that it allows for an added level of control-freakery if you've got client developers who aren't "allowed" to alter the abstract class - using constants in the abstract can let the other devs know how they're allowed to extend the base. – CD001 Apr 23 '12 at 8:53

I think the second option is better, using instanceof. This is in general common to all OOP design and not just PHP.

With your first option, you have specifics about derived classes in the base class, and thus must modify the base class for each new derived class you add, which should always be avoided.

Leaving the base class as-is when adding new derived classes promotes code reuse.

share|improve this answer

If there is a "right" way, and everything is subjective in coding of course (as long as it doesn't adversely impact performance/maintainability ;) ), then it's the second way as "Truth" and "Brady" have pointed out.

The upside of doing things the way you're doing them now (class constants in the abstract) is that when you're working with other developers it can provide hints as to how you expect the abstract class to be interacted with.

For instance:

$oKillerSharkFilm = Video::factory(Video::MOVIE, 'Jaws', 'Dundundundundundun');
$oKillerSharkDocumentary = Video::factory(Video::DOCUMENTARY, 'Jaws', 'A Discovery Shark Week Special');

Of course, the downside is that you have to maintain the "allowable extensions" in the abstract class.

You could still use the instanceof method as demonstrated in your question and maintain the list of allowable extension in the abstract predominantly for control/type fixing.

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