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Can I use variadic templates without using the template parameters as function parameters?

When I use them, it compiles:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<class First>
void print(First first)
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
}

template<class First, class ... Rest>
void print(First first, Rest ...rest)
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
    print<Rest...>(rest...);
}

int main()
{
    print<int,int,int>(1,2,3);
}

But when I don't use them, it doesn't compile and complains about an ambiguity:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<class First>
void print()
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
}

template<class First, class ... Rest>
void print()
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
    print<Rest...>();
}

int main()
{
    print<int,int,int>();
}

Unfortunately the classes I want to give as template parameters are not instantiable (they have static functions that are called inside of the template function). Is there a way to do this?

share|improve this question
1  
If you need an unevaluated expression of a given type, you can use std::declval<T>(). Works for any T, whether or not its constructible. – Kerrek SB Apr 23 '12 at 10:25
4  
As for why the no-argument version doesn't work: Without arguments, both overloads print<int, {}> and print<int> are equally good, while with arguments print<int>(3) is a better match than print<int, {}>(3, {}) (where {} means "nothing"). Not using overloads, as CatPusPus suggests, is the standard method; and since you're not deducing your arguments anyway it's the simplest solution. – Kerrek SB Apr 23 '12 at 10:30
    
I was going to post an answer but n.m. already posted it. – bames53 Apr 23 '12 at 20:57
up vote 16 down vote accepted
template<class First> // 1 template parameter
void print()
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
}

#if 0
template<class First, class ... Rest> // >=1 template parameters -- ambiguity!
void print()
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
    print<Rest...>();
}
#endif

template<class First, class Second, class ... Rest> // >=2 template parameters
void print()
{
    cout << 1 << endl;
    print<Second, Rest...>();
}
share|improve this answer

Make it a type.

template <typename... Ts>
struct print_impl;

template <typename T>
struct print_impl<T> {
    static void run() {
        std::cout << 1 << "\n";
    }
};

template <typename T, typename... Ts>
struct print_impl<T, Ts...> {
    static void run() {
        std::cout << 1 << "\n";
        print_impl<Ts...>::run();
    }
};

template <typename... Ts>
void print() {
    print_impl<Ts...>::run();
}

int main() {
    print<int, int, int>();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the complexity here is not merited. n.m.'s solution is much more straightforward. – bames53 Apr 23 '12 at 20:58

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