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I realized that I'm writing a lot of code similar to this one:

<% unless @messages.blank? %>
  <% @messages.each do |message|  %>
    <%# code or partial to display the message %>
  <% end %>
<% else %>
  You have no messages.
<% end %>

Is there any construct in Ruby and/or Rails that would let me skip that first condition? So that would be executed when iterator/loop won't enter even once? For example:

<% @messages.each do |message| %>
  <%# code or partial to display the message %>
<% and_if_it_was_blank %>
  You have no messages.
<% end %>
share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 35 down vote accepted

If you use the :collection parameter to render e.g. render :partial => 'message', :collection => @messages then the call to render will return nil if the collection is empty. This can then be incorporated into an || expression e.g.

<%= render(:partial => 'message', :collection => @messages) || 'You have no messages' %>

In case you haven't come across it before, render :collection renders a collection using the same partial for each element, making each element of @messages available through the local variable message as it builds up the complete response. You can also specify a divider to be rendered in between each element using :spacer_template => "message_divider"

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1  
great... how about a before collection and after collection? say you want to have <ul> and </ul> or <tr></tr> tag pairs before and after the partial rendering but only if the @messages ar enot empty. examples- > <p><ul><li>message1</li><message2></ul><p> is @messages!=nil OR <p><ul>no messages!<p> –  mataal Jun 22 '09 at 20:48
3  
I think that Fernando Allen's solution should be added to this answer as possible alternative, as people might skip it because it's not the "best answer". –  arikfr Feb 13 '11 at 14:35
1  
just a quick note that may be helpful. in order for this syntax to work, you must use parentheses around the partial assignment as shown above. without them, the partial renders correctly, but the conditional message does not –  pruett Jul 18 '12 at 17:17

One way is to do something like:

<%= render(:partial => @messages) || render('no_messages') %>

Edit:

If I remember correctly this was made possible by this commit:

http://github.com/rails/rails/commit/a8ece12fe2ac7838407954453e0d31af6186a5db

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As a note, you may as well just iterate over an empty array if you're looking for efficiency of expression:

<% @messages.each do |message|  %>
  <%# code or partial to dispaly the message %>
<% end %>
<% if (@messages.blank?) %>
  You have no messages.
<% end %>

While this does not handle @messages being nil, it should work for most situations. Introducing irregular extensions to what should be a routine view is probably complicating an otherwise simple thing.

What might be a better approach is to define a partial and a helper to render "empty" sections if these are reasonably complex:

<% render_each(:message) do |message|  %>
  <%# code or partial to dispaly the message %>
<% end %>

# common/empty/_messages.erb
You have no messages.

Where you might define this as:

def render_each(item, &block)
  plural = "#{item.to_s.pluralize}"
  items = instance_variable_get("@#{plural}")
  if (items.blank?)
    render(:partial => "common/empty/#{plural}")
  else
    items.each(&block)
  end
end
share|improve this answer

That code can be shortened to:

<%= @messages.empty? ? 'You have no messages.' : @messages.collect { |msg| formatted_msg(msg) }.join(msg_delimiter) %>

Comments:

formatted_msg() - helper method which adds formatting to the message

msg_delimiter - variable containing delimiter like "\n" or "<br />"

BTW I'd suggest to use empty? method instead of blank? for checking an array, because a) its name is more concise :) and b) blank? is an ActiveSupport extension method which won't work outside Rails.

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Thanks for suggesion but I prefer to use blank? because i don't have to check if object is not nil, and being only rails specific extension doesn't bother me much in this case. –  J T Jun 22 '09 at 16:34

You can create some custom helper. The following one is just an example.

# application_helper.html.erb
def unless_empty(collection, message = "You have no messages", &block)
  if collection.empty?
    concat(message)
  else
    concat(capture(&block))
  end
end

# view.html.erb
<% unless_empty @messages do %>
  <%# code or partial to dispaly the message %>
<% end %>
share|improve this answer

You could split up your two cases into different templates: one if messages exist and one if no message exist. In the controller action (MessagesController#index probably), add as the last statement:

render :action => 'index_empty' if @messages.blank?

If there are no messages, it'll display app/views/messages/index_empty.html.erb. If there are messages, it'll fall through and display app/views/messages/index.html.erb as usual.

If you need this in more than just one action, you can nicely refactor it into a helper method like the following (untested):

def render_action_or_empty (collection, options = {})
    template = params[:template] || "#{params[:controller]}/#{params[:action]}"
    template << '_empty' if collection.blank?
    render options.reverse_merge { :template => template }
end

With this, you just need to put render_action_or_empty(@var) at the end of any controller action and it'll display either the 'action' template or the 'action_empty' template if your collection is empty. It should also be easy to make this work with partials instead of action templates.

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You could also write something like this:

<% if @messages.each do |message| %>
  <%# code or partial to display the message %>
<% end.empty? %>
  You have no messages.
<% end %>
share|improve this answer
4  
I love this answer. I used this one out of all myself, super clean and very understandable. –  James F Jan 17 '12 at 2:03
    
Very maintainable solution, thanks! –  Matt Oct 1 '13 at 8:08
    
Awesome answer, very succinct. –  Shane Feb 17 at 6:19
    
Doesn't know that....thanks!!! –  rizidoro Jun 11 at 17:46
    
How would you do something like this in haml/slim? –  DickieBoy Nov 4 at 14:09

Old topic but I didn't really like any of these so playing around on Rails 3.2 I figured out this alternative:

<% content_for :no_messages do %>
  <p>
    <strong>No Messages Found</strong>
  </p>
<% end %>

<%= render @messages || content_for(:no_messages) %>

Or if you need a more verbose render with partial path like I did:

<%= render(:partial => 'messages', 
     :collection => @user.messages) || content_for(:no_messages) %>

This way you can style the "no messages" part with whatever HTML / view logic you want and keep it nice a easy to read.

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I'm surprised my favorite answer isn't up here. There is an answer thats close, but I don't like bare text and using content_for is klunky. Try this one on for size:

  <%= render(@user.recipes) || content_tag("p") do %>
    This user hasn't added any recipes yet!
  <% end %>
share|improve this answer
    
This is my favourite answer so far. –  dkubb Nov 5 '13 at 23:45

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