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I'm fairly new to SQL and I'm trying to translate some Oracle commands to SQL Server. The issue lies with converting the following right outer join:

where
   SOURCE_FORMATS.LOC_SIMPLE_ENTITY_ID = FILEFORMAT_INTERNAL_SIGNATURES.LOC_FILEFORMAT_ID (+)

As far as I can understand in SQL this has to be represented in the "from" section to be something like:

from
   SIMPLE_ENTITIES "SOURCE_FORMATS"  
RIGHT OUTER JOIN FILEFORMAT_INTERNAL_SIGNATURES
on SOURCE_FORMATS.LOC_SIMPLE_ENTITY_ID = FILEFORMAT_INTERNAL_SIGNATURES.LOC_FILEFORMAT_ID

Is this logic correct?

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Yes, this is correct, and it's the better solution, too, since it conforms to the ANSI standard of how to write JOIN's - I would prefer this over the Oracle format any day. –  marc_s Apr 23 '12 at 10:45
3  
No, I think first query is a LEFT JOIN. –  Florin Ghita Apr 23 '12 at 10:51
1  
Oracle has supported ANSI outer join syntax for well over a decade now (since version 9.0 in 2001). The old (+) syntax was what Oracle had before the ANSI join syntax was established. I believe other RDBMSs at that time had similar proprietary syntax such as *= –  Tony Andrews Apr 23 '12 at 11:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the pre-ANSI Oracle syntax for outer join, the (+) is used against the table which is expected to be deficient, not against the table to be preserved.

So:

select * from t1, t2 where t1.col1 = t2.col2 (+)

is the same as

select * from t1 left join t2 on t1.col1 = t2.col2
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer and I like the simple example. Thanks –  Fraser Apr 23 '12 at 13:01
    
Thanks all for pointing out this is a left join, not a right join –  Fraser Apr 23 '12 at 13:01

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