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Any know of a way to make javascript/jquery only apply to everything inside a div or iframe?

As an example: I have a cool javascript function that makes my text change colours, but it changes the colours of the entire page of text when I only want it to change the text inside a div or iframe.

Any ideas?

Here is some code:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function() { //  When the document is ready
    $.foo({
            fontchange: true,             //  Make the text pretty
        });
    });
</script>

EDIT: This seems to be more trouble than it is worth, thanks for the help.

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10  
Code is worth a thousand words. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 23 '12 at 11:26
1  
When writing your javascript/jQuery code, you instruct it on how to act, and what parts of the page to affect. We'd need to see the code to be able to comment on what specific parts to change. A lot of jQuery snippets are as simple as $('everything').myPlugin(); which you'd only have to change to $('subset-of-everything').myPlugin();. –  David Hedlund Apr 23 '12 at 11:28
    
What have you tried so far ? Heard of jQuery selectors ? –  tea_totaler Apr 23 '12 at 11:28
    
@McDan Garrett: Thanks for the code. See my updated answer. –  RichieHindle Apr 23 '12 at 11:38

3 Answers 3

Updated answer after code was posted:

Your posted code $.foo({fontchange: true}) suggests you're using a jQuery plug-in which is somewhat unusual, in that it doesn't work on a set of selected elements. That's not how plug-ins usually work, so we can't help without knowing what plug-in you're dealing with (presumably its documentation talks about how to make it more targeted).

The usual use of a jQuery plug-in is that first you get a set of elements to act on, usual selectors (see below), and then you call the plug-in function on them. E.g., $("some selector here").foo({fontchange: true});. But that's not how this particular, unusual plug-in seems to work.


Original answer:

You've tagged your question jquery, so: You can get a jQuery wrapper around any element or set of elements on your page for which you can write a CSS3 selector (and a few more) and the jQuery function, which is usually also available via its alias $.

So for instance, if you have a div with an id of "foo", this will get a jQuery instance for that div using the CSS selector #foo:

var foo = $("#foo");

If you have a bunch of spans inside a div, you can get them using the usual descendant selector syntax:

var spans = $("div span");
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Your function probably references document.body at some point to get the nodes to change. Instead of document.body, give it something else. In the case of most elements, just passing the element is fine. In the case of an iframe, however, the page inside MUST be from the same origin (scheme, host, port) and you need to pass the frame's contentDocument (and optionally a specific element from there).

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Sorry I am not at all good with javascript, How could I turn document.body into what it needs to be to apply to a div with the id "Foo"? –  McDan Garrett Apr 23 '12 at 11:30
    
Um... Edit the source? –  Niet the Dark Absol Apr 23 '12 at 11:33
    
I mean, what does document.body need to be replaced with? –  McDan Garrett Apr 23 '12 at 11:34

Most jQuery calls use what's called a "selector" to select the elements to work on. Your code probably looks something like:

$('body').do_cool_stuff();

to select the whole body. 'body' is the selector there, and you can change it to:

$('#somediv').do_cool_stuff();

to select only a single div:

<div id='somediv'>...</div>

The # in the selector corresponds with the id attribute of the div.

Edit, now that we have some code: try changing $.foo(...) into $('#somediv').foo(...).

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That seems to stop it working completely –  McDan Garrett Apr 23 '12 at 11:41
    
@McDanGarrett: Then you'll need to give us a lot more information, eg. what the foo() function actually looks like. (Is it really called foo() or is a jQuery plugin that we can go and look at?) The ideal thing to do would be to post a failing example on jsfiddle. –  RichieHindle Apr 23 '12 at 11:44
    
The function (found in foo.js) is just something I downloaded and added that code to my site, seems more trouble than it's worth, thanks for the help. –  McDan Garrett Apr 23 '12 at 11:47

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