Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use some middleware I wrote across the whole of my site (large # of pages, so I chose not to use decorators as I wanted to use the code for all pages). Only issue is that I don't want to use the middleware for the admin code, and it seems to be active on them.

Is there any way I can configure the settings.py or urls.py perhaps, or maybe something in the code to prevent it from executing on pages in the admin system?

Any help much appreciated,

Cheers

Paul

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

A general way would be (based on piquadrat's answer)

def process_request(self, request):
    if request.path.startswith(reverse('admin:index')):
        return None
    # rest of method

This way if someone changes /admin/ to /django_admin/ you are still covered.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice tip for flexibility. –  Török Gábor Oct 7 '10 at 14:04

You could check the path in process_request (and any other process_*-methods in your middleware)

def process_request(self, request):
    if request.path.startswith('/admin/'):
        return None
    # rest of method

def process_response(self, request, response):
    if request.path.startswith('/admin/'):
        return response
    # rest of method
share|improve this answer

The main reason I wanted to do this was down to using an XML parser in the middleware which was messing up non-XML downloads. I have put some additional code for detecting if the code is XML and not trying to parse anything that it shouldn't.

For other middleware where this wouldn't be convenient, I'll probably use the method piquadrat outlines above, or maybe just use a view decorator - Cheers piquadrat!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.