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wordsFreq = {}
words = []
while True:
    inputWord = raw_input()
    if (inputWord != ""):
        words.append(inputWord)
    else:
        break
for word in words:
    wordsFreq[word] = wordsFreq.get(word, 0) + 1

for word,freq in wordsFreq.items():
    print word + " - " + str(freq)

Apparently my words[] and the for loop is redundant but I had no further explanation than that, can anyone explain to me why it is redundant?

share|improve this question
    
the whole thing is redundant if you can use Counter :D docs.python.org/library/collections.html#collections.Counter –  jamylak Apr 23 '12 at 12:13
    
The objective is not to use Counter :) –  JamieB Apr 23 '12 at 12:16
    
Ah ok well in that case i recommend defaultdict unless you aren't allowed to use that either. –  jamylak Apr 23 '12 at 12:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can skip the step of building a list of words and instead directly create the frequency dict as the user is entering words. I've used defaultdict to avoid having to check if a word has already been added.

from collections import defaultdict

wordsFreq = defaultdict(int)
while True:
    word = raw_input()
    if not word:
        break
    wordsFreq[word] += 1

If you aren't allowed to use defaultdict, it could look like this:

wordsFreq = {}
while True:
    word = raw_input()
    if not word:
        break
    wordsFreq[word] = wordFreq.get(word, 0) + 1
share|improve this answer

You can use collections.Counter to do this easily:

from collections import Counter

words = []
input_word = True
while input_word:
    input_word = raw_input()
    words.append(input_word)

counted = Counter(words)

for word, freq in counted.items():
    print word + " - " + str(freq)

Note that an empty string evaluates to false, so rather than breaking when it equals an empty string, we can just use the string as our loop condition.

Edit: If you don't wish to use Counter as an academic exercise, then the next best option is a collections.defaultdict:

from collections import defaultdict

words = defaultdict(int)
input_word = True
while input_word:
    input_word = raw_input()
    if input_word:
        words[input_word] += 1

for word, freq in words.items():
    print word + " - " + str(freq)

The defaultdict ensures all keys will point to a value of 0 if they havn't been used before. This makes it easy for us to count using one.

If you still want to keep your list of words as well, then you would need to do that in addition. E.g:

words = []
words_count = defaultdict(int)
input_word = True
while input_word:
    input_word = raw_input()
    if input_word:
        words.append(input_word)
        words_count[input_word] += 1
share|improve this answer

I think your teacher was trying to say you can write the loop like this

wordsFreq = {}
while True:
    inputWord = raw_input()
    if (inputWord != ""):
        wordsFreq[inputWord] = wordsFreq.get(inputWord, 0) + 1
    else:
        break

for word,freq in wordsFreq.items():
    print word + " - " + str(freq)

There is no need to store the words in a temporary list, you can count them as you read them in

share|improve this answer

You can do this:

wordsFreq = {}
while True:
    inputWord = raw_input()
    try:
         wordsFreq[inputWord] = wordsFreq[inputWord] + 1
    except KeyError:
         wordsFreq[inputWord] = 1
share|improve this answer
3  
If one were to do it this way, a defaultdict or using the default value in dict.get() would be better. –  Lattyware Apr 23 '12 at 12:18

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