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I have a test which tests Stateless Session Bean using OpenEJB. I am using Maven for build management. The test seems to work perfectly fine out of Jenkins (on command line) but fails after I added the job on Jenkins.

More specifically, my test is not able to lookup the EJB in the JNDI and gets following exception.

javax.naming.NameNotFoundException: Name "global/slides/SlideService" not found.
    at org.apache.openejb.core.ivm.naming.IvmContext.federate(IvmContext.java:198)
    at org.apache.openejb.core.ivm.naming.IvmContext.lookup(IvmContext.java:152)
    at org.apache.xbean.naming.context.ContextFlyweight.lookup(ContextFlyweight.java:55)
    at com.diycomputerscience.slides.service.SlideServiceTest.setUp(SlideServiceTest.java:45)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runBare(TestCase.java:132)
    at junit.framework.TestResult$1.protect(TestResult.java:110)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.runProtected(TestResult.java:128)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.run(TestResult.java:113)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.run(TestCase.java:124)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.runTest(TestSuite.java:243)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.run(TestSuite.java:238)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.JUnit38ClassRunner.run(JUnit38ClassRunner.java:83)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.junit4.JUnit4Provider.execute(JUnit4Provider.java:236)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.junit4.JUnit4Provider.executeTestSet(JUnit4Provider.java:134)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.junit4.JUnit4Provider.invoke(JUnit4Provider.java:113)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.util.ReflectionUtils.invokeMethodWithArray(ReflectionUtils.java:189)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.booter.ProviderFactory$ProviderProxy.invoke(ProviderFactory.java:165)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.booter.ProviderFactory.invokeProvider(ProviderFactory.java:85)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.booter.ForkedBooter.runSuitesInProcess(ForkedBooter.java:103)
    at org.apache.maven.surefire.booter.ForkedBooter.main(ForkedBooter.java:74)

I wonder if running the tests in Jenkins somehow affects the JNDI? I know that Jenkins uses Maven embedder, but Surefire plugin forks the tests by default and it possibly not running inside the same vm instance as of Jenkins.

I am running the jenkins in foreground (java -jar jenkins.war) and also running with the same user as I am logged in so there is no permissions issue. Also I do not need Window Manager running as my tests do not need to interact with UI unlike Selenium.

The Java and Maven version I am using in both environments is exactly identical too.

Any pointers?

share|improve this question
    
With the OpenEJB log output it might be easier to see what is happening. Usually goes to System.out and is in the build output. – David Blevins May 10 '12 at 14:34

Did you try using this?

"java:comp/env/MY_JNDI_RESOURCE" 
share|improve this answer

This can easily happen if Jenkins is actually using a different Java JRE to run your application - try running it with an explicit path to Java. Make sure you test that command outside Jenkins first.

I've just had the exact same problem and it turned out that a Windows Firewall entry had not been created for the specific JRE that Jenkins used - even despite my adding a global port exception into my firewall.

I simply ran my Java application with a complete path to Java, added the firewall rule to my Windows Firewall when the notification appeared and then re-ran in Jenkins and everything worked.

share|improve this answer

I had this happen recently and thought I would share what I uncovered. When my unit tests ran within Jenkins, the jndi path that OpenEJB was "figuring out" was different than when I built it directly in my maven project from my IDE, so it was adding the Jenkins created "workspace" directory to the jndi path, which caused the lookups to fail. So

java:global/ProjectName/ProjectService

would be the name in my IDE while

java:global/workspace/ProjectService

would be calculated for the binding name in Jenkins. I was able to figure this out by the OpenEJB logging.

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