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I have the following code which gives the warning in the title. I am pretty sure I have done something like this before but it didnt give any warning. I would like to ask two things of those posting. 1) What here would cause a problem? 2) Does it need to be fixed?

The reason I ask is that this code works fine as I expect it to so clearly this warning is not causing an issue. I cannot stand to have warnings etc in my code though and so would like a solution to this but I also want to know why this warning occurs and if it is harmful in any way.

Code:

 public class AttributeType
 {
      private string m_attributeNameField;

      public string AttributeName
      {
          get { return m_attributeNameField; }
          set { m_attributeNameField = value; }
      }
 }

 private StandardResponseType ValidateAttributes(string featureType, IEnumerable<AttributeType> attributeList, string userCategory)
 {
       StandardResponseType standardResponse = 
       new StandardResponseType(DateTime.Now.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), "RWOL_UTILS.Get_Item_Attributes", "", "OK");

        if (attributeList.Any())
        {
            foreach (AttributeType attribute in attributeList)
            {
                if (attribute.AttributeName == null) continue;
                {
                    //do stuff
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            standardResponse.Message = "Error: No attributes passed in the list. ValidateAttributes().";
            standardResponse.ResponseCode = "FAIL";

            return standardResponse;
        }
}

EDIT: There is more code in the method but it doesn't have a bearing on this issue.

UPDATE: I had to add the follwing code to make this work. Why is it more efficient to add this? If I have to count and read the new list then what is the difference between doing that and doing it on the original item? The list is only ever passed once. I could understand this issue if the list was populated within the method but is isnt. It is just passed in already filled.

List<AttributeType> newlist = attributeList.ToList();

if (newlist.Count() != 0)
{
    foreach (AttributeType attribute in newlist)
............
share|improve this question
    
what type is attributeList? –  Daniel A. White Apr 23 '12 at 12:48
    
Don't see the full code, but you don't cause any side effect. Have you tried filter it with LINQ? –  lukas Apr 23 '12 at 12:49
    
I dont know any LINQ so wouldnt like to mess about with it to be honest. I will post more code. –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 12:50
    
@DanielA.White The attributeList is IEnumerable<AttributeType> –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 12:58
    
I have added an update. Is there not a more elegant way of solving this issue than putting the list inside another list? I would have thought that I would only have my list passed into the method once so why does counting it and reading it cost any more than reading it into another list and doing the same with that? –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 13:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The possible problem depends on where your IEnumerable comes from. Some data sources might only allow for a single enumeration or they might be expensive (maybe some database query), which would be already started by attributeList.Any().

You can just remove the Any() check, because if there are no elements in your IEnumerable , your loop won't run anyway (assuming your example shows the complete picture and there is no other logic dependent on the check).

EDIT: Based on your edited question, you cannot remove the check. But, you can use attributeList.ToArray() to convert your IEnumerable to an array which you then work with and get rid of the warning.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried using .ToArray() and .ToList and neither rids me of the issue. –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 13:01
    
@CSharpened You should store the result of one of those calls in a appropriately typed variable and then use that variable for both the check and the loop. Also, you don't need Any() then, but the Length (array) or Count (List) properties. –  Botz3000 Apr 23 '12 at 13:03
1  
@CSharpened I don't think it's an issue by itself, the compiler just cannot predict which data source the IEnumerable has, so its warning is not unreasonable. You could also change the signature of your method to expect an array, but of course that's not always possible. Or use a bool to keep track of whether any items were processed. That would also cover the case where all AttributeNames are null (which you might or might not want to handle the same as if there were no AttributeTypes). –  Botz3000 Apr 23 '12 at 13:17
1  
@CSharpened IEnumerable is just an interface that specifies that it can be enumerated. What happens at each iteration is completely unknown to the compiler. Of course, by expecting an IEnumerable, you also explicitly allow for this kind of flexibility. Because of that, i think the compiler is right. Regarding usage, i would go with changing the parameter to an array or with the flag approach. –  Botz3000 Apr 23 '12 at 13:32
1  
It's too bad that C# foreach and vb.net For Each weren't designed so they could accept either an enumerable object or an enumerator, since there are situations like reading items from a queue where one might logically want to use foreach with a source that can only supply items once, but such items probably shouldn't implement IEnumerable<T>. –  supercat Apr 23 '12 at 16:25

Just get rid of the if; it's useless.

The warning is from Resharper, and it's warning you that if attributeList is expensive to enumerate, your code will be slow. (because it enumerates once for the Any() and a second time for the foreach)

share|improve this answer
    
So how would you suggest taking actions in case the foreach is empty? A bool indicator is ugly. What else have you got? (I'm not in favor of the Any() at all - I'm just saying lets think of the best solution) –  Yorye Nathan Apr 23 '12 at 12:56
    
I had initially used an if(count>0) to test if any were present but changed to Any() by resharper. –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 12:59

The cause is that call attributeList.Any() which starts down the attributeList and as soon as it finds something it enters your for loop. Then you do a foreach over the list, which again traverses the entire list.

You actually don't need the .Any() here as doing a foreach over an empty enumerable will not cause any problems, it just won't return anything.

Where you could get into a problem is if you were pulling data from a DB and inside a foreach made another call to the enumeration, since it's deferred execution you could get different results back that you aren't expecting on your second call.

share|improve this answer

I'm guessing attributeList is an IEnumerable<> of some sort. IEnumerable objects, unlike Lists, aren't necessarily a list of objects in memory, and might be bound to complex logic that queries a DB for them every time you iterate over it. Using C#'s yield return commands can also return an IEnumerable that has logic bound to every iteration.

Because of this behavior, the warning tells you that you might be iterating over your attributes more than once, a potentially expensive operation. Once during the Any(), and once over the foreach. It's true that in this case the Any() is superfluous, but in general you can avoid this warning by calling ToList() or ToArray() on your IEnumerable, thus performing the enumeration once and storing the result in an explicitly allocated list/array. Now you can go over it again and again with no performance implications.

share|improve this answer

No, you don't need to solve it. However, if your if (attributeList.Any()) doesn't have an else, you can eliminate it completely, which will get rid of the warning. In fact, your code sample can be replaced with:

foreach (AttributeType attribute in attributeList.OfType<AttributeType>())
{
    // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have added more code. If does have an else used to report that no attributes were sent with the request. –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 12:56

You don't have to check .Any() here is the fixed code :

        bool empty = true;
        foreach (AttributeType attribute in attributeList) 
        { 
            empty = false;
            if (attribute.AttributeName == null) continue; 
            { 
                //do stuff 
            } 
        } 
        if (empty)
        {
          {  
              standardResponse.Message = "Error: No attributes passed in the list.       ValidateAttributes().";  
              standardResponse.ResponseCode = "FAIL";  

              return standardResponse;  
          }  
        }

Checking .Any() can cause an enumeration, That's why you get a warning => First enumeration "Any" to check if it is empty and a second enumeration "foreach".

If the type of attributeList allows it, you can check Count or Length :

    if (attributeList.Count != 0)         
    {         
        foreach (AttributeType attribute in attributeList)         
        {         
            if (attribute.AttributeName == null) continue;         
            {         
                //do stuff         
            }         
        }         
    }         
    else         
    {         
        standardResponse.Message = "Error: No attributes passed in the list. ValidateAttributes().";         
        standardResponse.ResponseCode = "FAIL";         

        return standardResponse;         
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
I will add more code. The If is there to test whether any attributes are passed. –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 12:51
    
@CSharpened I edited my answer to handle the "else". –  Guillaume Apr 23 '12 at 13:02
    
.Count does not solve the issue. The If(...Any()) line was previously the one you state. I changed it after a suggestion from ReSharper. Probably not a good idea to listen to ReSharper lol –  CSharpened Apr 23 '12 at 13:04
    
.Count() is worse than .Any() as it does a complete enumeration but .Count or .Length property is usually OK (you may want to check that implementation is O(1)). –  Guillaume Apr 23 '12 at 13:18

I was able to allow you do this, which it prettier:

But anyways, when you call .Any() it only iterates over the first item, so it really isn't THAT bad.

This way is just more readable, although kinda ugly in the background (still efficient).

        bool any;

        foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(0, 100).Loop(out any))
        {
            // Do loop logic
        }

        if (!any)
        {
            // Handle empty IEnumerable
        }

How?!:

public static class Ex
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Loop<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, out bool any)
    {
        var b = true;

        var enumerable = source.Loop(() => { b = false; });

        any = b;

        return enumerable;
    }

    private static IEnumerable<T> Loop<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Action anySetter)
    {
        var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();

        enumerator.Reset();

        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            anySetter();
            yield break;
        }

        do
        {
            yield return enumerator.Current;
        } while (enumerator.MoveNext());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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