Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to open a file within a large code.

I was told that, when dealing with files, it might be a better practice to use the absolute path rather than the relative path. However this code is to be used by different people, who might put the sources in different places (/home/username, or /home/username/desktop/, for example) so I think it might be better to use a relative path to access my configuration file, because I know where it is in relation to my cpp file.

Here is a short sum up of the location of the files relevant to my question:

  • the file I want to read is /home/me/myproject/config/myfile.txt

  • the file I am reading it from is /home/me/myproject/src/myfile.cpp

  • the file that contains 'main' is also /home/me/myproject/src/myfile.cpp (this one file is huge).

I'm launching the executable from eclipse. I think eclipse sets the working directory to the directory where 'main' is (/home/me/myproject/src/).

I am puzzled by the fact that when I'm about to call file.open(), the working directory (getcwd()) now is /home/me/myproject/. Apparently the working directory was modified by the code in between main() and my call to file.open().

My question is: it seems very error prone to rely on the working directory, if it can be changed by another part of the program. On the other hand, how else I am supposed to know where my configuration path is, given that I don't know where the other developers usually put their sources ?

share|improve this question
1  
Tell your application where the configuration file is on the command line. –  Nick Apr 23 '12 at 13:30
    
Do you need this to work on any platform, or only UNIX-like ones? –  leftaroundabout Apr 23 '12 at 13:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm launching the executable from eclipse. I think eclipse sets the working directory to the directory where 'main' is (/home/me/myproject/src/).

Are you sure about that? It appears to me that it is the top level of the project folder (ie, something like "/home/eclipse/myproject", and not "/home/eclipse/src". That would explain why:

the working directory (getcwd()) now is /home/me/myproject/.

Was it ever anything else? It is very unlikely that it was "changed by another part of the program" unless you explicitly did something to cause that.

It's not clear to me that you understand the difference between source code and executable. Your source code file is not "run". It is compiled into an executable, and that is what is run. With eclipse, these get put by default into Release/ or Debug/ (have a look), not a src/ directory. The (presumable) reason eclipse uses the toplevel directory is consistency between those versions, and so you can, eg, output relative to that.

My question is: it seems very error prone to rely on the working directory,

That is definitely true regardless. There are OS specific ways to get the path to the user's home directory. You should get that, and specify in the documentation where the config is to be kept. If the user cannot do that properly, it is not your fault -- but issue an informative message, eg. "Config file not found!".

how else I am supposed to know where my configuration path is, given that I don't know where the other developers usually put their sources ?

Note that "other developers" do not necessarily include the source at all, since it is not required to run the executable.

share|improve this answer

It is always a good idea to accept the file location as an argument, so people using your software can try different configurations without hassle.

What you can always do is figure out the location of the binary that is currently running. If you don't find a direct way, use a combination of getcwd() and argv[0]. The working directory is not changed after the command is run, if the process doesn't change it itself.

Then you can cut-off the filename and append the configuration file's name to the path (stored in the String base in the following example). Here is some code that figures out if a path is absolute or relative, and appends it accordingly. You need boost_filesystem for that to be cross-platform:

#ifdef WITH_BOOST_FILESYSTEM
    boost::filesystem::path basepath(base), filepath(filename);
    if (!basepath.is_complete()) {
        basepath = filepath.remove_leaf() /= basepath;
        base = basepath.string();
    }
#elif __unix__
    if (base[0] != '/') {
        char *f = strdup(filename.c_str()), *d = dirname(f);
        base = string(d).append("/").append(base);
        free(f);
    }
#else
    std::cerr << "Warning: only absolute file paths accepted." << std::endl;
#endif
    base.append("/");
share|improve this answer
    
Downvote for using strdup on std::string, not releasing memory returned by strdup and missing declaration of base. –  SigTerm Apr 23 '12 at 14:39
    
It is a code excerpt, what you may well guess from the text. But thanks for your kind debugging efforts anyway. –  ypnos Apr 23 '12 at 17:19
    
From dirname man page: "Both dirname() and basename() may modify the contents of path, so it may be desirable to pass a copy when calling one of these functions." That's why the strdup is necessary. c_str() gives only a const pointer. –  ypnos Apr 23 '12 at 17:23
    
"But thanks for your kind". I don't care about excuses. Write clean/elegant code instead. __unix__ version might crash if base is empty. –  SigTerm Apr 23 '12 at 17:35
2  
I think you should change your attitude. –  ypnos Apr 23 '12 at 21:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.