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I have verybasic question ( i dont know why i unable to think stright ).

I am trying to do some polymorphism .

I have interface look like this:

Public interface Iplugin
{

   void doSomthing(string _str);
}

I also have some plugins classes that implament this interface

public class plugin1:Iplugin
{
    void doSomthing(string _str)
    {
        if (_str=="1")
        {
           // do somthing 1
        }
     }
 }

 public class plugin2:Iplugin
{
    void doSomthing(string _str)
    {
        if (_str=="2")
        {
           // do somthing 2
        }
     }
 }

public class plugin3:Iplugin
{
    void doSomthing(string _str)
    {
        if (_str=="3")
        {
           // do somthing 3
        }
     }
 }

So I have the main class and I would like it to invoke the all plug in

BUT I would like it to save the OCP (Open-Closed Principle) so If I will add in the future another plugin class the main class will not changed.

This is the main class

public class mainApp
{
  Iplugin _context;
  mainApp()
  {
     _context= new //new what??
  }
  bool func(string str)
  {
      _context.doSomthing(str);//I would like it to invoke all the plug in and also a future plugins that I will add
  }
} 
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4  
Not sure what the real question is? You surely need some inheritance in there and to make doSomething virtual? –  Ian Apr 23 '12 at 14:05
    
Making plugins aren't a trivial programming task, and it's often a reason where you don't/can't follow a lot of standard practices. If you're just trying to find an example to learn about programming I'd suggest staying away from plugins, at least for now. If this isn't just an academic exercise feel free to ignore me. –  Servy Apr 23 '12 at 14:15

4 Answers 4

Of course, to create a specific Iplugin you need to know the implementing type. Look at the Factory Pattern.

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For cases like this i like to use the Factory Pattern. You can easily combine that with some Attributes and Reflection magic to build a repository of available plugins

[PluginAttribute("myPlugin")]
class MyPlugin : IPlugin

now the factory initially checks all classes in all loaded assemblies and searches for the attribute and stores the type and the plugin string identifier in a dictionary.

class PluginFactory
{
    static Iplugin CreatePlugin(string aName)
    {
        return Activator.CreateInstance( sRegisteredPlugins[aName]);
    }

    private static Dictionary<string, Type> sRegisteredPlugins;
}
share|improve this answer
    
HI ,for what should I need the PluginAttribute? and what should i put in it –  MoShe Apr 23 '12 at 19:05
    
@MoShe I use the attribute to mark classes for the factory. That way the factory needs to check each class in all loaded assemblies, and see if it implements the IPlugin interface and has the attribute. An abstract plugin might only have the interface but should not have the attribute. If both are true, the name in the attribute and the type are stored in the dictionary. Of course you could also create a register method and do that by hand, like Péter Töröks answer. But i prefer this automatic way. –  dowhilefor Apr 23 '12 at 22:17
    
What do you think about my answer ? I think it save the ocp –  MoShe Apr 24 '12 at 16:14
    
@MoShe it depends on the usage, i would not create all plugins on loading. For example if i would support different video codecs like that i would only create the video codec plugin if the user really wants to use it. Also using GetExecutingAssembly might not be enough, maybe you want to load additional dlls aswell. Also you assume that your plugins always are in one namespace, which is a bit strict, again this hinders to allow adding new plugins simply by adding a new dll. But its a good start. But i'm not sure why you think your solution saves the open/closed principle. –  dowhilefor Apr 24 '12 at 16:54

You could add a collection to store your plugins. The collection can be filled in one place, then passed to another method which just iterates through all plugins and invokes them. This way it is totally independent of what types of plugins there are in the collection.

And as @Ian mentioned, you need to declare doSomthing virtual for this to work properly.

public class mainApp
{
  mainApp()
  {
    List<Iplugin> plugins = new ArrayList<Iplugin>;

    ...

    plugins.add(new plugin1());
    ...
    plugins.add(new plugin3());
    ...
    func(plugins, "1");
    ...
    func(plugins, "7");
  }

  bool func(List<IPlugin> plugins, string str)
  {
    foreach (IPlugin plugin in plugins) {
      plugin.doSomthing(str);
    }
  }
}

This is a simplistic example of Dependency Injection, which is one well known application of polymorphism (well, to make it real DI, you should put func into a different class). To make your code more flexible, and to decouple the creation of your plugins from their usage, you can also use e.g. a Factory Method or Builder.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok Thank you all for your help.

I take all your advice and I did the following:

 namespace Plugins
{




 public class plugin1 : Iplugin
  {
    void doSomthing(string _str)
    {
        if (_str == "1")
        {
            // do somthing 1
        }
    }


}

public class plugin2 : Iplugin
{
    void doSomthing(string _str)
    {
        if (_str == "2")
        {
            // do somthing 2
        }
    }


}

public class plugin3 : Iplugin
{
    void doSomthing(string _str)
    {
        if (_str == "3")
        {
            // do somthing 3
        }
    }


 }
}

SO this is name space with all the plugins

now in the main app

namespace Factory
{
  public interface Iplugin
  {

    void doSomthing(string _str);
  }



class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string @namespace = "Plugins";

        var q = from t in Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes()
                where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == @namespace
                select t;
        q.ToList();

        List<Iplugin> myList = new List<Iplugin>();
        foreach (var item in q)
        {
            Iplugin temp=(Iplugin)Activator.CreateInstance(item);
            myList.Add(temp);// a list with all my plugins

        }

        foreach (var item in myList)
        {
           item.doSomthing("string");

        }

    }
}

}

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