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I have asp:TextBox to keep a value of money, i.e. '1000', '1000,0' and '1000,00' (comma is the delimiter because of Russian standard).

What ValidationExpression have I to use into appropriate asp:RegularExpressionValidator?

I tried \d+\,\d{0,2} but it doesn't allows a number without decimal digits, e.g. just '1000'.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted
\d+(,\d{1,2})?

will allow the comma only when you have decimal digits, and allow no comma at all. The question mark means the same as {0,1}, so after the \d+ you have either zero instances (i.e. nothing) or one instance of

,\d{1,2}

As Helen points out correctly, it will suffice to use a non-capturing group, as in

\d+(?:,\d{1,2})?

The additional ?: means that the parentheses are only meant to group the ,\d{1,2} part for use by the question mark, but that there is no need to remember what was matched within these parenthesis. Since this means less work for the regex enginge, you get a performance boost.

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1  
you don't have to escape the comma, do you? –  tanascius Jun 22 '09 at 16:39
    
you're right, correcting it –  balpha Jun 22 '09 at 16:40
2  
It's better to use a non-capturing group since there's no need to capture the submatch. –  Helen Jun 22 '09 at 16:54
    
Helen: True, I've added that. –  balpha Jun 22 '09 at 16:59
1  
Thanks a lot for advanced explanation! –  abatishchev Jun 22 '09 at 17:15

We use this very liberal regular expression for money validation:

new Regex(@"^\-?\(?\$?\s*\-?\s*\(?(((\d{1,3}((\,\d{3})*|\d*))?(\.\d{1,4})?)|((\d{1,3}((\,\d{3})*|\d*))(\.\d{0,4})?))\)?$");

It allows all these: $0, 0, (0.0000), .1, .01, .0001, $.1, $.01, $.0001, ($.1), ($.01), $(.0001), 0.1, 0.01, 0.0001, 1., 1111., 1,111., 1, 1.00, 1,000.00, $1, $1.00, $1,000.00, $ 1.0000, $ 1.0000, $ 1,000.0000, -1, -1.00, -1,000.00, -$1, -$1.00, -$1,000.00, -$ 1, -$ 1.00, -$ 1,000.00, $-1, $-1.00, $-1,000.00, $(1), $(1.00), $(1,000.00), $ (1), $ (1.00), $ (1,000.00), ($1), ($1.00), ($1,000.00)

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i used this one in javascript: may be of use for you in c#

var entered = '10.00';
var regex = /^\d+(?:\.\d{2})?$/; // starts with N digits optional ".\d\d"
console.log(entered.match(regex));
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