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So I'm working on SQL Server 2008 and I have this query which should be quite simple, but for some reason doesn't work. It basically looks like that:

SELECT TOP 10
    u.Id                AS "UserId",
    u.CreationDate      AS "Member since",
    AVG(q.Score)        AS "Average Question Rating",  
    COUNT(q.Id)         AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent",
    AVG(a.Score)        AS "Average Answer Rating",  
    COUNT(a.Id)         AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent"
FROM    
        Users u, 
        Answers a, 
        Questions q
WHERE q.OwnerUserId = u.Id
AND a.OwnerUserId = u.Id
GROUP BY u.Id, u.CreationDate

When I only work on either the Answers table or the Questions table, everything is ok. But as soon as I try to do both at once (like in the query above), the COUNTs don't work at all. What I get is that the COUNT(a.Id) is identical to the COUNT(q.Id). So I tried reducing my query to see what was wrong, and I realized that I just had to add the Questions or the Answers table (even without using them anywhere) to the FROM clause when working with the other table and everything was ruined.

I'm sure it's something ridiculously trivial that I have overlooked but it's driving me crazy, I'd be thankful if anybody could point me what went wrong. Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
first thing, you should just proper JOIN syntax on your joins instead of the commas between the table names – bluefeet Apr 23 '12 at 15:25
1  
You've joined on q.OwnerUserId into both tables. But I'm guessing that each owner has more than one question and/or more than one answer. And if that's true, then you're going to get a cartesian product of all the persons's questions & answers, rather than only a list of each of them individually. – Mike Ryan Apr 23 '12 at 15:26
2  
SQL doesn't work this way. When including both Answers and Questions you will get the cross product grouped by userid. That means you get Answers of a user * Questions of a user. – Jan Apr 23 '12 at 15:26
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're not joining Answers and Questions correctly for the aggregation. Between Answers and Questions, the result is a cartesian product (for every user, every answer is coupled with every question)

The simplest way to correct this is to perform aggregation in subqueries:

SELECT TOP 10
    u.Id                AS "UserId",
    u.CreationDate      AS "Member since",
    ISNULL((SELECT AVG(Score) FROM Answers   WHERE OwnerUserId = u.Id), 0)
                        AS "Average Question Rating",  
           (SELECT COUNT(*)   FROM Answers   WHERE OwnerUserId = u.Id)        
                        AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent",
    ISNULL((SELECT AVG(Score) FROM Questions WHERE OwnerUserId = u.Id), 0)
                        AS "Average Answer Rating",  
           (SELECT COUNT(*)   FROM Questions WHERE OwnerUserId = u.Id)
                        AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent"
FROM  Users u

Alternatively using joins:

SELECT TOP 10
     u.Id                AS "UserId",
     u.CreationDate      AS "Member since",
     ISNULL(q.a, 0)      AS "Average Question Rating",  
     ISNULL(q.c, 0)      AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent",
     ISNULL(a.a, 0)      AS "Average Answer Rating",  
     ISNULL(a.c, 0)      AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent"
FROM Users u
-- If you LEFT JOIN these tables, you'll get also results for users without
-- questions or answers
LEFT OUTER JOIN (SELECT OwnerUserId, AVG(Score) a, COUNT(*) c 
     FROM Questions GROUP BY OwnerUserId) q
     ON  q.OwnerUserId = u.Id
LEFT OUTER JOIN (SELECT OwnerUserId, AVG(Score) a, COUNT(*) c 
     FROM Answers GROUP BY OwnerUserId) a
     ON  a.OwnerUserId = u.Id

I don't know SQL Server's query optimiser well enough, so I can't say which one is going to be faster. The first solution could take advantage of scalar subquery caching, if that is available in SQL Server. Otherwise, the second query maybe performs less nested loops.

share|improve this answer
    
Aw now I feel like a complete idiot. Thank you so much ! – Jérémie Clos Apr 23 '12 at 17:18
    
@JérémieClos: It happens to the best :) – Lukas Eder Apr 24 '12 at 8:07

As noted elsewhere, your join on user ID on both questions and answers essentially produces a cartesian join at the user level between the two tables. A better approach would be to use a union:

SELECT TOP 10
    u.Id                AS "UserId",
    u.CreationDate      AS "Member since",
    AVG(q_score)        AS "Average Question Rating",  
    COUNT(q_id)         AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent",
    AVG(a_score)        AS "Average Answer Rating",  
    COUNT(a_id)         AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent"
FROM Users u
JOIN (select OwnerUserId,
             Score        q_score,
             Id           q_id,
             NULL         a_score,
             NULL         a_id
      from Answers
      union all
      select OwnerUserId,
             NULL         q_score,
             NULL         q_id,
             Score        a_score,
             Id           a_id
      from Questions) qa
  ON qa.OwnerUserId = u.Id
GROUP BY u.Id, u.CreationDate
share|improve this answer
    
+1: That might actually be the fastest solution, so far – Lukas Eder Apr 24 '12 at 8:09

Wouldn't just counting the DISTINCT Ids work?

SELECT TOP 10 
    u.Id                         AS "UserId", 
    u.CreationDate               AS "Member since", 
    AVG(q.Score)                 AS "Average Question Rating",   
    COUNT(DISTINCT q.Id)         AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent", 
    AVG(a.Score)                 AS "Average Answer Rating",   
    COUNT(DISTINCT a.Id)          AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent" 
FROM     
        Users u,  
        Answers a,  
        Questions q 
WHERE q.OwnerUserId = u.Id 
AND a.OwnerUserId = u.Id 
GROUP BY u.Id, u.CreationDate 
share|improve this answer
    
Agree, COUNT(DISTINCT) would help in fixing the counts, but not the averages. – Andriy M Apr 23 '12 at 16:56
1  
@AndriyM: As a matter of fact, it might just work, as every question is equally duplicated by the number of answers. While this would be wrong for SUM(), it might be curiously correct for AVG(). Of course, that's not the right way to go... – Lukas Eder Apr 24 '12 at 7:18
    
@LukasEder: Mais oui! Neatly spotted. – Andriy M Apr 24 '12 at 8:20
    
I was only looking at the COUNTs as that is what was being asked in the question, yeah you're right its not going to work for the AVG() – domager Apr 24 '12 at 10:03
    
@domager: Actually, as Lukas pointed out, I'm (most probably) wrong, and the AVG() results will be correct in this case, but only because it's AVG. The average is the sum divided by the count, and if there are duplicates, then both the sum and the count will increase proportionally, thus not affecting the resulting average values. If it was SUM() instead of AVG(), the results would clearly be incorrect, but as it is, the only issue is likely going to be efficiency. – Andriy M Apr 24 '12 at 10:24

If it were me I would do explicit joins on those other tables (answers and questions). how is it linking the other tables if you don't do a join?

SELECT TOP 10
    u.Id                AS "UserId",
    u.CreationDate      AS "Member since",
    AVG(q.Score)        AS "Average Question Rating",  
    COUNT(q.Id)         AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent",
    AVG(a.Score)        AS "Average Answer Rating",  
    COUNT(a.Id)         AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent"
FROM    
        Users u, 
        Answers a, 
        Questions q
WHERE q.OwnerUserId = u.Id
AND a.OwnerUserId = u.Id
GROUP BY u.Id, u.CreationDate

would be

SELECT TOP 10
    u.Id                AS "UserId",
    u.CreationDate      AS "Member since",
    AVG(q.Score)        AS "Average Question Rating",  
    COUNT(q.Id)         AS "N. of Questions posted by the agent",
    AVG(a.Score)        AS "Average Answer Rating",  
    COUNT(a.Id)         AS "N. of Answers posted by the agent"
FROM    
        Users u
JOIN Answers a on u.ID = a.ID (assuming thats how answers and users are linked).
JOIN Questions q on a.ID = q.ID (assuming thats how questions and answers are linked)
WHERE q.OwnerUserId = u.Id
AND a.OwnerUserId = u.Id
GROUP BY u.Id, u.CreationDate
share|improve this answer
    
The OP did join the table using q.OwnerUserId = u.Id AND a.OwnerUserId = u.Id... – Lukas Eder Apr 23 '12 at 15:40
2  
-1 - While this syntax is often accepted as 'better' (And I much prefer it myself), you need to realize that a comma-seperated FROM clause uses 'implicit' joins (And he has the join criteria listed rather nicely). Furthermore, this will not solve the OP's actual problem, as it's the very fact that he's performing the join with both Answers and Questions that is resulting in 'wrong' results. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 23 '12 at 15:45

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