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I need to add transactions for a sql statement in a database application, up to this point, I have not need to do this, as I was primarily pulling data, or doing very small changes to existing data.

I have been using a tidy construct quite successfully with nested using statements, but I want to check with people who know better than me if this modified construct will work as I expect with the transaction embedded.

        using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand())
        using (cmd.Connection = new SqlConnection()) {
            cmd.Connection.ConnectionString = "...";
            cmd.Connection.Open();
            using (SqlTransaction tran = cmd.Connection.BeginTransaction()) {
                // do the work (try catch wraps the statements)
                // commit transaction if no errors found or rollback
            }
            cmd.Connection.Close();
        }

Thank you in advance Regards Martin

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is a built in class TransactionScope that is easier to use. Instantiate it in a using block and anything inside it will be part of the same transaction.

using(var ts = new TransactionScope())
using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand()) 
using (cmd.Connection = new SqlConnection()) 
{ 
  cmd.Connection.ConnectionString = "...";
  cmd.Connection.Open();

  // Do the work

  ts.Complete();

  cmd.Connection.Close();
}

If any exceptions occurs, the transactionscope will automatically abort all operations when disposed. The transactionscope also affects any operations done in any function called, without the need to pass db connections around.

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Sounds very interesting (and clean), but how does the system connect the connection to the transactionscope? –  marts Apr 23 '12 at 17:06
    
The connection is aware of the TransactionScope and automatically enlists in the transaction. Internally I guess that the TransactionScope uses some thread local storage, but that's nothing the code using it has to care about. –  Anders Abel Apr 23 '12 at 17:23
    
Thank you, that makes good sense to me now. One more question though, if I want to use the connection/command for multiple unrelated tasks, would I use ts.Complete(); after each task? –  marts Apr 23 '12 at 17:31
    
That's another question - so I think it's better to post it as a new question. To be honest: I've never reused transaction scopes, so I don't know. –  Anders Abel Apr 23 '12 at 19:04

As you have it written, it won't work - you have to associate the command with the transaction via the SqlCommand class's Transaction property . Also, you might have to have the connection open first to start the transaction

Using TransactionScope is easier, but it requires that the database server is setup to use the MSDTC

We use a shared environment where I work, and the MSDTC is not an option.

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I just checked in the database, and that service is running, thanks :) –  marts Apr 23 '12 at 18:17
    
As long as there is only one connection involved, no MSDTC is required. With SQL2008 several connections with identical connection strings can participate in a transaction without MSDTC too. –  Anders Abel Apr 23 '12 at 19:03
    
Good to know, thanks. We're still using SQL Server 2005, but this'll be useful when we upgrade to 2012 in a few months –  Jim McKeon Apr 23 '12 at 19:06

Instead of SqlTransaction, consider using TransactionScope.

With TransactionScope you will need to wrap its using statement around the SqlConnection creation. In order to commit, you need to call Complete before the end of the block.

using (var tx = new TransactionScope())
using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand())
using (cmd.Connection = new SqlConnection()) 
{
    cmd.Connection.ConnectionString = "...";
    cmd.Connection.Open();

    // do the work (try catch wraps the statements)
    // commit transaction if no errors found or rollback

    tx.Complete(); // commits transaction
}
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