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I have the below piece of code that I have developed ..

public byte determineCardType(final IInput inputData) {
    byte cardType = UNKNOWN_CARD;
    try {
        if (isWagRewardsLoyaltyCard(inputData))
            cardType = WAG_LOYALTY_CARD_TYPE;
        else if (isDRCard(inputData))   //checking that card scanned and swiped is a DR Card
            cardType = DR_CARD_TYPE;      
        else if (isWagRewardsPartnerCard(inputData))
            cardType = AARP_CARD_TYPE;
        return cardType;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return UNKNOWN_CARD;
    }
}

please advise me can the above code can be adjusted in switch loop, if yes then please advise, Thanks in advance.

the other code that is linked to it...

if((aarpCardSupport.isAARPCard(input))||(determineCardType(input)==DR_CARD_TYPE)) {
    return true;
} else if((isDRCard(input))&&(isDRLoayltyEnabled())) { //would return 1 for DR card only when isDRLoayltyEnabled returns true 
    return true;
}       
return false ;
share|improve this question
    
Did your teacher ask you to switch to switch? ;) – adarshr Apr 23 '12 at 15:53
    
You should provide some code of your is*Card methods. – Sirko Apr 23 '12 at 15:53
    
if((aarpCardSupport.isAARPCard(input))||(determineCardType(input)==DR_CARD_TYPE)‌​) { return true; }else if((isDRCard(input))&&(isDRLoayltyEnabled())) //would return 1 for DR card only when isDRLoayltyEnabled returns true { return true; } return false ; } – user1370546 Apr 23 '12 at 15:55
    
@adarshr.. No man, its for my knowledge.!! – user1370546 Apr 23 '12 at 15:56
    
@user1344709 please make use of the edit functionality and don't paste code into a comment but rather add it to your quetsion (nicely formatted of course :) ). – Thomas Apr 23 '12 at 15:57

Switch won't help you, but conditional expressions can:

return isWagRewardsLoyaltyCard(inputData) ? WAG_LOYALTY_CARD_TYPE
     : isDRCard(inputData) ? DR_CARD_TYPE
     : isWagRewardsPartnerCard(inputData) ? AARP_CARD_TYPE
     : UNKNOWN_CARD;

I would strongly recommend against catching Exception, btw. Catch specific exception types if you must - although in that case I'd at least log the error before returning.

EDIT: As for the second piece of code, it looks like you just want:

return aarpCardSupport.isAARPCard(input)
    || determineCardType(input) == DR_CARD_TYPE
    || (isDRCard(input) && isDRLoayltyEnabled);

Although why determineCardType(input) would return something other than DR_CARD_TYPE when isDRCard(input) returns true is a mystery...

share|improve this answer
    
..amazing dude , expressed the condition in form of ternary operator , highly appreciable , thanks a lot, so please advise the above code can be expressed as ..public byte determineCardType(final IInput inputData) { byte cardType = UNKNOWN_CARD; try { return isWagRewardsLoyaltyCard(inputData) ? WAG_LOYALTY_CARD_TYPE : isDRCard(inputData) ? DR_CARD_TYPE : isWagRewardsPartnerCard(inputData) ? AARP_CARD_TYPE : UNKNOWN_CARD; catch (Exception e) { return UNKNOWN_CARD; } } } – user1370546 Apr 23 '12 at 16:05
    
+1, for recommending against catching Exception. – Makoto Apr 23 '12 at 16:12
    
@user1344709: Edited according to the code in your question. It's not clear why you've posted yet more code in the comments, but it's basically unreadable there. – Jon Skeet Apr 23 '12 at 16:16

Don't do it. If you must do it, you could do it like this:

public byte determineCardType (final IInput inputData) {
    byte cardType = UNKNOWN_CARD;
    try {
      switch (isWagRewardsLoyaltyCard (inputData) ? 1 : 
        (isDRCard (inputData) ? 2 : (isWagRewardsPartnerCard (inputData) ? 3 : 4)))
        {
            case 1: cardType = WAG_LOYALTY_CARD_TYPE; break;
            case 2: cardType = DR_CARD_TYPE; break;
            case 3: cardType = AARP_CARD_TYPE; break;
            default: // UNKNOWN_CARD already default
        }
        return cardType;
    } catch (CardException ce) {
      return UNKNOWN_CARD;
    }
  }
}

But since you return a cardType as byte, you can switch later, after setting the type. This code is harder to read than your code. Jons code is at least lean.

I see you're new to switch statements. So I elaborate a little.

A switch statement is useful if your input is in Integral form (int, byte, short, Enum), and if you can match it against a - mostly medium short list of values.

And if you otherwise would use a sequence of if/else statements. Case statements needn't be mutual exclusive, but most times they are.

In your case, you call 3 methods which return booleans, so the input isn't integral. But your output is.

Later in the code, you could write:

      byte cardType = determineCardType (inputDate);
      switch (cardType)
      {
            case WAG_LOYALTY_CARD_TYPE: doWlct (foo, bar); break;
            case DR_CARD_TYPE:   doDct (); break;
            case AARP_CARD_TYPE: doAct (baz); foobar (); break;
            case UNKNOWN_CARD:   System.err.println ("Unknown card");
      }

Else you would have to write:

      if (cardType == WAG_LOYALTY_CARD_TYPE) 
           doWlct (foo, bar); 
      else if (cardType == DR_CARD_TYPE) 
           doDct ();
      else if (cardType == AARP_CARD_TYPE) {
           doAct (baz); 
           foobar ();
      }
      else ...

Since Java 1.7 switch over Strings is possible as well, but until then, you could only switch over integral types, and the case labels have to be literally constant and known at compile time.

In OOP, switch statements are often abandoned in favor of dynamic dispatch.

interface Card {
    public abstract int authenticate (); 
}

class WagLoyalityCard implements Card {
    public int authenticate () {
       doWlct (foo, bar);
    }
}

class DrCard implements Card {
    public int authenticate () {
       doDct ();
    }
}

// ... and so on

Card card = new DrCard (); 
// authenticate:
card.authenticate (); 

// depending on the card type, DrCard.authenticate () or 
// WagCard.authenticate () gets called. 
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, so this will also works , thanks a lot – user1370546 Apr 23 '12 at 16:11
    
@userunknown..please advise But since you return a cardType as byte, you can switch later, after setting the type.. in which context you were saying , couldn;t grasp. – user1370546 Apr 23 '12 at 16:27
    
@user1344709: Tried to explain it better. – user unknown Apr 23 '12 at 16:52

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