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I'd like to loop through a set of members which are of the same type. Here is a solution which sometimes works, sometimes not:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
class Test{
   public:
      Test():xmin(0),ymin(0),xmax(0),ymax(0),acs((vector<int> (&)[4])xmin){};
      vector<int> xmin,ymin,xmax,ymax;
      vector<int> (&acs)[4];
};
int main(){
   Test t;
   t.xmin.push_back(2);
   cout << t.xmin.size() << "=!=" <<t.acs[0].size() << endl;
}

the above test code works for me. In a much bigger program I do at the moment it does not, i.e. t.ymin does not seems to be the same as t.acs[1] and so on. Is the above construct in general meaningful or should I do it completely different?

Thanks in advance, Thomas

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4  
You're certainly playing with undefined behaviour there. There's no guarantee that consecutive class members are laid out in the same way as array elements. –  Mike Seymour Apr 23 '12 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use an array of pointers to members. This way is probably fastest (seems like it's important to you), but a bit obscure, and you have to mention the list of your member variables a second time.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Test
{
    std::vector<int> xmin,ymin,xmax,ymax;

    std::vector<int>& GetByIndex(int index)
    {
        typedef std::vector<int> Test::*ptr_to_member; // typedef makes syntax less crazy

        static const ptr_to_member pointers[4] = {
            &Test::xmin, &Test::ymin, &Test::xmax, &Test::ymax
        };

        return this->*pointers[index];
    }
};

int main(){
    Test t;
    t.xmin.push_back(2);
    std::cout << t.xmin.size() << "=!=" << t.GetByIndex(0).size() << '\n';
}

If you don't need speed, a very simple solution involves a switch:

std::vector<int>& GetByIndex(int index)
{
    switch (index) {
    case 0: return xmin;
    case 1: return ymin;
    case 2: return xmax;
    case 3: return ymax;
    default: abort();
    }
}
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aborting on a wrong index :) that's nice... The switch version although "slower" shouldn't really be noticeable. –  RedX Apr 24 '12 at 7:50
    
Thanks, that will do the trick! On a related issue: I modified your approach by setting the pointers in the constructor Test():xmin(0),ymin(0),xmax(0),ymax(0),acs({&xmin,&ymin,&xmax,&ymax}){}; and the member vector<int>* acs[4]; . That seems to work in the test script but i now get a warning warning: extended initializer lists only available with -std=c++0x or -std=gnu++0x . The same warning occurs if I assign in the contructor and not in the initializer list. Should I bother? Thanks –  Thomas Handorf Apr 24 '12 at 8:49

This is very bad practice. In particular, you're dependend on padding details. There's no guarantee that the compiler will layout the data members without any padding in between. If you mean array, use an array. My 2c...

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Mike Seymour -absolutely right - your solution is dangerous.

Try inject following:

class Test
{
    struct AllArrays
    {
        vector<int> * vec1, .... * vecN;
    };
    union 
    { 
        AllArrays _as_fields;
        vector<int> * _as_Array[];
    } _allTogether;
};

The payload for this that you need write little bit long qualifier:

Test t;
t._allTogether._as_fields.vec1
share|improve this answer
    
union containing vector is invalid (doesn't compile), at least in C++03 –  anatolyg Apr 23 '12 at 16:42
    
@anatolyg take a look that I have used pointer vector<int> *. Pointers are allowed inside union! –  Dewfy Apr 23 '12 at 16:44
    
Then, you must use vector<int>* as_array[4] instead of vector<int> [] _as_Array –  anatolyg Apr 23 '12 at 16:51
    
@anatolyg You are right, it is my mistake, just corrected –  Dewfy Apr 24 '12 at 7:43
    
Thanks, but indeed the qualifier gets quit long (-; –  Thomas Handorf Apr 24 '12 at 8:51

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