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I have created a EF 4 & C# to get some data. I am using Linq. Its as follows:

    public List<object> GenerateCallTrackingReport(int startRowIndex, int maximumRows, int createdByID)
    {
        var query = from c in this.ObjectContext.CallLogs                        
                    select new
                    {
                        CallLogID = c.CallLogID,
                        DomainName = c.CallDomain.FullName,
                        CreatedByID = c.CreatedByID,
                        CreatedBy = c.CreatedByUser.FirstName + " " + c.CreatedByUser.LastAccessIPN,
                        CalledOn = c.CallDate,
                        IssueResolutionTime = c.IssueResolutionTime,                            
                        CallType = c.CallType.FullName,
                        CallDescription = c.CallDescription,
                        CustomerName = (c.CustomerID > 0 ? c.Customer.FirstName + " " + c.Customer.LastAccessIPN : c.TempCaller.FirstName + " " + c.TempCaller.LastName),
                        CustomerEmail = (c.CustomerID > 0 ? c.Customer.Email : string.Empty),
                        CustomerResponse = c.Response.FullName,
                        IsPending = c.IsPending,
                        NeedFurtherContact = c.NeedFurtherContact
                    };

        if (createdByID > 0)
            query = query.Where(c => c.CreatedByID == createdByID);

        if (maximumRows > 0)
            query = query.Skip(startRowIndex).Take(maximumRows);

        return query.ToList<object>();

    }

This is causing the following error:

Unable to cast the type 'System.Int64' to type 'System.Object'. LINQ to Entities only supports casting Entity Data Model primitive types.

Any Idea y am i getting this error??

Thanks

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1  
What line is the exception on? –  Christopher Rathermel Apr 23 '12 at 16:20
1  
@ChristopherRathermel Because of how Linq-To-EF works, the exception will probably occur at the last line no matter where the source of the problem is, and be mostly useless. –  millimoose Apr 23 '12 at 16:24
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3 Answers

Once you get to the ToList call you want to be performing it in C#, not in the database. Use AsEnumerable as a way of saying, "Stop doing this stuff in the database, do it in C#."

Add that right before the ToList at the end so that everything else is done on the database.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Resolved

I had two issues, each of them would cause this error:

1. I was accessing NULLABLE entity properties without checking if they have value or not. Say CustomerID is NULLABLE, so my query became something like this!

    var query = from c in this.ObjectContext.CallLogs                        
                select new
                {
                    CallDescription = c.CallDescription,
                    CustomerID = c.CustomerID.HasValue ? c.CustomerID.Value : 0,
                    CustomerName = c.CustomerID.HasValue ? c.Customer.Name : ""
                };

    if (maximumRows > 0)
        query = query.Skip(startRowIndex).Take(maximumRows);

    return query.ToList<object>();

So just check any null value by its HasValue property before accessing it (2nd line in select portion).

2. I Was also trying to convert integer to string within the select statement. So i just decided that conversion in HTML instead of directly doing it here. This solved my issues.

Hope this helps someone!

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same issue here. can u post the updated query too.. –  VeeKayBee Jul 5 '12 at 6:35
    
updated my answer. hope this helps –  Aamir Jul 5 '12 at 10:03
    
yep :) i got the idea and implemented. thanks amir. :). My issue is also the same. 1 and 2. ? will work for 1 and 'SqlFunctions.StringConvert' will help to convert to string. Thanks :) –  VeeKayBee Jul 5 '12 at 11:27
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First, I wouldn't retrieve the whole table, then do queries on the full dataset in C# as you are doing here. Chaining linq to entities methods like this will make it faster - massively so when you get huge datasets:

this.ObjectContext.CallLogs
    .Where(c => c.CreatedByID == createdByID)
    .Skip(startRowIndex)
    .Take(maximumRows)
    .Select(new
        {
                        CallLogID = c.CallLogID,
                        DomainName = c.CallDomain.FullName,
                        CreatedByID = c.CreatedByID,
                        CreatedBy = c.CreatedByUser.FirstName + " " + c.CreatedByUser.LastAccessIPN,
                        CalledOn = c.CallDate,
                        IssueResolutionTime = c.IssueResolutionTime,                            
                        CallType = c.CallType.FullName,
                        CallDescription = c.CallDescription,
                        CustomerName = (c.CustomerID > 0 ? c.Customer.FirstName + " " + c.Customer.LastAccessIPN : c.TempCaller.FirstName + " " + c.TempCaller.LastName),
                        CustomerEmail = (c.CustomerID > 0 ? c.Customer.Email : string.Empty),
                        CustomerResponse = c.Response.FullName,
                        IsPending = c.IsPending,
                        NeedFurtherContact = c.NeedFurtherContact
        })
    .ToList();

Second, I don't know the exact problem, but creating a list of dynamic objects like this isn't really a good idea. Create a CallLogModel class with the properties you are putting in the object like this:

.Select(new CallLogModel
        {
                        CallLogID = c.CallLogID,
                        DomainName = c.CallDomain.FullName,
                        CreatedByID = c.CreatedByID,
                        CreatedBy = c.CreatedByUser.FirstName + " " + c.CreatedByUser.LastAccessIPN,
                        CalledOn = c.CallDate,
                        IssueResolutionTime = c.IssueResolutionTime,                            
                        CallType = c.CallType.FullName,
                        CallDescription = c.CallDescription,
                        CustomerName = (c.CustomerID > 0 ? c.Customer.FirstName + " " + c.Customer.LastAccessIPN : c.TempCaller.FirstName + " " + c.TempCaller.LastName),
                        CustomerEmail = (c.CustomerID > 0 ? c.Customer.Email : string.Empty),
                        CustomerResponse = c.Response.FullName,
                        IsPending = c.IsPending,
                        NeedFurtherContact = c.NeedFurtherContact
        })
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1  
-1 The OPs code will execute just one query. It will not fetch everything and then filter on the client side. Your code does not perform exactly the same query as his, so it's not even any more helpful. This is the real power of LINQ, it is a QUERY, not a set of data. This means you can conditionally add operations to the query, just as the OP does. He even names the variable "query" rather than "data" to reflect this distinction. Finally, the OP's problem (not resolved by you) is entirely because the whole thing is trying to be resolved by the DB, which can't ToList anything. –  Servy Apr 23 '12 at 16:41
    
As to the bit about creating a new Type rather than returning object, I agree that would probably be best, but that's a comment, not an answer to the problem. –  Servy Apr 23 '12 at 16:43
    
Fair enough comment, I suppose I need to look into LINQ more as it seems my previous assumptions were incorrect - you learn new something everyday :) –  jcvandan Apr 24 '12 at 8:06
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