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Given:

struct A
{
    virtual bool what() = 0;
};

template<typename T, typename Q>
struct B : public A
{
    virtual bool what();
};

I want to partially specialize what like:

template<typename T, typename Q>
bool B<T, Q>::what()
{
    return true;
}

template<typename Q>
bool B<float, Q>::what()
{
    return false;
}

But it appears that this isn't possible (is it in C++11?) so I tried SFINAE:

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, float>::value, bool>::type B<T>::what()
{
    return true;
}

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<T, float>::value, bool>::type B<T>::what()
{
    return false;
}

This also doesn't work, I have no idea why though, does anyone? So I found this thread and ended up with:

template<typename T, typename Q>
struct B : public A
{
    virtual bool what()
    {
        return whatimpl(std::is_same<T, float>());
    }

    bool whatimpl(std::false_type)
    {
        return false;
    }

    bool whatimpl(std::true_type)
    {
        return true;
    }
};

This final solution works, but why doesn't the enable_if technique work? I'm also very open to suggestions of a cleaner answer that I haven't encountered yet.

I simplified my examples as much as possible - in my real use case what() isn't called what and actually does a fair bit of work, and I'll want to 'specialize' on a user defined type, not float.

share|improve this question
1  
@Nawaz I did realize that, but this is just a simplified case to show what I'm trying to do :) Read the last line in the post. –  Dave Apr 23 '12 at 16:44
    
what isn't a template method, to override A::what() it should be a single non-template method of class template B. You can't specialize non-template method, neither with enable_if nor with any other techique. However you can specialize the whole class B –  user396672 Apr 23 '12 at 16:49
    
@user396672 Then why does this work (full specialization instead of partial): template<> bool B<float, float>::what() { return false; } –  Dave Apr 23 '12 at 17:05
    
Interesting indeed (BTW +1 for the question) seems I'm wrong. I guess the reason this not working is that partial specialization is not allowed for functions at all (as the standard says). –  user396672 Apr 23 '12 at 17:42
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Partial specialization is explicitly permitted by the standard only for class templates (see 14.5.5 Class template partial specializations)

For members of class template only explicit specialization is allowed.

14.7 (3) says:

An explicit specialization may be declared for a function template, a class template, a member of a class template or a member template. An explicit specialization declaration is introduced by template<>.

So any definition starting with

template<typename T>  

is not an allowed syntax for member of class template specialization.

[edit]

As to SFINAE attempt, it failed because actually there are neither overloads nor specializations here (SFINAE works while defining a set of candidate functions for overload resolution or while choosing proper specialization). what() is declared as a single method of class template and should have a single definition, and this definition should have a form:

template<typename T, typename Q> 
B<T,Q>:: bool what(){...}

or may be also explicitly specialized for particular instantiation of class B:

template<> 
B<SomeParticularTypeT,SomeParticularTypeTypeQ>:: bool what(){...}

Any other forms are syntacticaly invalid, so SFINAE can't help.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this explains the first failed attempt. Any insight on the SFINAE attempt? –  Dave Apr 24 '12 at 10:16
    
@Dave: SFINAE abbreviates "SPECIALIZATION failure is not an error", so it is just a particular technique for specialization. Starting with template<typename T>... you tried to partially specialize a method of class template just using some more complicated way. –  user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 11:56
    
@Dave:: ...or template<typename T> may start method definition for class template B<T>, but in this case it is not a specialization at all and SFINAE also doesn't work. –  user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 12:04
    
@Dave: sorry... SFINAE means "substitution.."; nevertheless all the above seems right :). –  user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 12:15
    
sorry again... something wrong in my comments :) I've edited the answer –  user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 12:39
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Why not just change it to..

template<typename T, typename Q> 
struct B : public A 
{   
   bool what()
   {
      return false; //Or whatever the default is...
   }
}; 

template<typename Q>
struct B<float, Q> : public A 
{   
   bool what()
   {
      return true;
   }
}; 
share|improve this answer
    
Because B is a giant class and I don't want to copy/paste a giant class 15 times for each specialization of what() –  Dave Apr 23 '12 at 22:21
    
@Dave: ... although you may inherit from intermediate giant class adding only what() override in the final class. –  user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 8:13
    
@user396672 I could only do that if I added an extra class in the inheritance - note that A isn't templated so B's functionality really couldn't be put in there. The extra class would need to be templated and go between A and B. That could be written as another answer to respond to other techniques to handle this –  Dave Apr 24 '12 at 10:14
    
@Dave: Indeed, I actually meant to introduce additional (intermediate "giant") class template between A and B. –  user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 11:58
2  
You never said anything about B being a giant class, based off your example and description alone I proposed this solution. Thanks for the downvote. –  clanmjc Apr 24 '12 at 15:15
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