Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Javascript syntax: what comma means?

What does this pattern return? How does it work?

return myfunc(), myobj.myvar = someobj.prop, myobj

I have not come across this pattern before but have been looking at the Bing Maps Ajax Control and have noticed this pattern several times.

As I understand it multiple values are not returned. So what does this pattern do? What is returned? What is this pattern's benefit?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by casperOne Apr 25 '12 at 11:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Does it return a set of arguments; like how you can overload the parameters in a function call? –  Click-Rex Apr 23 '12 at 16:35
1  
"What is this patterns benefit?" — It doesn't have one. It is confusing, non-idiomatic code. –  Quentin Apr 23 '12 at 16:37
    
I cannot see any reason... It even places more objects on the stack than if there was three normal instructions... –  dystroy Apr 23 '12 at 16:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

It's the comma operator. It runs a series of expressions, in order, and then returns the result of the last of them. Exactly like:

myfunc();
myobj.myvar = someobj.prop;
return myobj;

Some people really prefer to do things on one line, even when there's no objective reason to. There no benefit in the example you gave, and in fact it's confusing because it makes it look like the first two bits relate to the value that will ultimately be returned, which they don't. (I wrote that before you told us it was minified code; obviously, being unclear to humans is only an issue in source code, not minified code.)

Since you've said it's a minifier: The very small possible benefit the minifier might have gotten there is if this is part of a conditional block: It can save one or two characters. If we assume the long form looked like this:

if (someCondition) {
    myfunc();
    myobj.myvar = someobj.prop;
    return myobj;
}

...using the comma operator, the minifier can do this (63 characters):

if(someCondition)return myfunc(),myobj.myvar=someobj.prop,myobj

...rather than this (65 characters):

if(someCondition){myfunc();myobj.myvar=someobj.prop;return myobj}

...without changing the functionality of the code, if what follows is a } or some other appropriate character (or end-of-file) to trigger automatic semicolon insertion at the end. Otherwise, it would need the ; on the first one, but that still saves one character.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 (I've just learned a new thing) –  MilkyWayJoe Apr 23 '12 at 16:41
1  
What's worse is that you can put all that on one line. Using a , instead of a ; just allows the return statement to go at the front where it will confuse maintainers. –  Quentin Apr 23 '12 at 16:41
    
@Quentin: Quite. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 23 '12 at 16:42
    
This is actually what I suspected but it just seemed strange that the first two statements don't appear before the return statement if they aren't going to be returned. The code is minified, I wonder if it has something to do optimization and minification? I don't really see how it would make any difference. –  FunkyFresh84 Apr 23 '12 at 16:47
1  
@FunkyFresh84: A minifier wouldn't be doing its job if it didn't save a character wherever it can safely do so. ;-) –  squint Apr 23 '12 at 17:24

The comma operator evaluates (from left to right) the expressions and then it returns the last result, which in this case will be the evaluation of the myobj identifier.

You can do this eliminate some curly braces if that's important to you...

if (true)
    ;// do something
else
    return myfunc(), myobj.myvar = someobj.prop, myobj

...as opposed to...

if (true)
    ;// do something
else {
    myfunc();
    myobj.myvar = someobj.prop;
    return  myobj;
}
share|improve this answer

in your example myobj should be returned where as every thing before gets executed

myfunc();
myobj.myvar = someobj.prop;
return myobj;
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.