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Assuming I have some object like, with LOTS of properties:

public class SomeObject
{
  public SomeOtherObject1 Property1 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject2 Property2 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject3 Property3 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject4 Property4 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject5 Property5 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject6 Property6 { get; set; }
}

It would be really cool if I could create a constructor and copy the properties into the constructor...

public class SomeObject
{
  public SomeObject
  {
    public SomeOtherObject1 Property1 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject2 Property2 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject3 Property3 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject4 Property4 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject5 Property5 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject6 Property6 { get; set; }
  }

  public SomeOtherObject1 Property1 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject2 Property2 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject3 Property3 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject4 Property4 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject5 Property5 { get; set; }
  public SomeOtherObject6 Property6 { get; set; }
}

And use Visual Studio's Find And Replace with Regex to change the highlighted lines in the constructor from:

    public SomeOtherObject1 Property1 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject2 Property2 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject3 Property3 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject4 Property4 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject5 Property5 { get; set; }
    public SomeOtherObject6 Property6 { get; set; }

to:

    this.Property1 = new SomeOtherObject1();
    this.Property2 = new SomeOtherObject2();
    this.Property3 = new SomeOtherObject3();
    this.Property4 = new SomeOtherObject4();
    this.Property5 = new SomeOtherObject5();
    this.Property6 = new SomeOtherObject6();

First I tried:

public\s{:i}\s{:i}\s{\sget;\sset;\s}

this.\2 = new \1();

Then I thought maybe it was a line issue, so I tried:

^\s*public\s{:i}\s{:i}\s{\sget;\sset;\s}.$

this.\2 = new \1();

Anyone else have any thought on how to get this to work?

share|improve this question
    
Generally, backreferences are captured using () not {}, but I've never used the Visual Studio find and replace, so I can say for certain. This would mean your find would be: ^\s*public\s(:i)\s(:i)\s{\sget;\sset;\s}.$ instead. You might also need to escape the other braces: ^\s*public\s(:i)\s(:i)\s\{\s*get;\s*set;\s*\}.*$ –  OmnipotentEntity Apr 23 '12 at 16:47
    
In Visual Studio, it's {}, not () for capturing –  sinelaw Apr 23 '12 at 16:50
    
@OmnipotentEntity .. yeah as sinelaw said its {}... Thank you Microsoft! (Took me a while to figure that out) –  Erik Philips Apr 23 '12 at 16:55
    
Uuuuuuugh, how stupid. –  OmnipotentEntity Apr 23 '12 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to escape the {} around get; set;. Also, I've used :b instead of \s and allowed for more than one. Here:

public:b+{:i}:b+{:i}:b*\{:b*get;:b*set;:b*\}

And as you wrote:

this.\2 = new \1();
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