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I am trying to create a simple WF4 activity that accepts a string that contains a VB.NET expression (from say the database), evaluates that string using the variables available in the current scope of the workflow and returns the result. Unfortunately, with the ways I've tried it, whether it be with a plain on Activity or a full-fledged NativeActivity, I keep hitting a wall.

My first attempt was with a simple Activity, and I was able to make a simple class that evaluates an expression given some object as its input:

public class Eval<T, TResult> : Activity<TResult>
{
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<T> Value { get; set; }

    public Eval(string predicate)
    {
        this.Implementation = () => new Assign<TResult>
        {
            Value = new InArgument<TResult>(new VisualBasicValue<TResult>(predicate)),
            To = new ArgumentReference<TResult>("Result")
        };
    }

    public TResult EvalWith(T value)
    {
        return WorkflowInvoker.Invoke(this, new Dictionary<string, object>{ {"Value", value } });
    }
}

This woks nicely, and the following expression evaluates to 7:

new Eval<int, int>("Value + 2").EvalWith(5)

Unfortunately, I can't use it the way I want since the expression string is given as a constructor argument instead of as an InArgument<string>, so it can't be easily incorporated (dragged and dropped) into a workflow. My second attempt was to try and use NativeActivity to get rid of that pesky constructor parameter:

public class NativeEval<T, TResult> : NativeActivity<TResult>
{
    [RequiredArgument] public InArgument<string> ExpressionText { get; set; }
    [RequiredArgument] public InArgument<T> Value { get; set; }

    private Assign Assign { get; set; }
    private VisualBasicValue<TResult> Predicate { get; set; }
    private Variable<TResult> ResultVar { get; set; }

    protected override void CacheMetadata(NativeActivityMetadata metadata)
    {
        base.CacheMetadata(metadata);

        Predicate = new VisualBasicValue<TResult>();
        ResultVar = new Variable<TResult>("ResultVar");
        Assign = new Assign { To = new OutArgument<TResult>(ResultVar), Value = new InArgument<TResult>(Predicate) };

        metadata.AddVariable(ResultVar);
        metadata.AddChild(Assign);
    }

    protected override void Execute(NativeActivityContext context)
    {
        Predicate.ExpressionText = ExpressionText.Get(context);
        context.ScheduleActivity(Assign, new CompletionCallback(AssignComplete));
    }

    private void AssignComplete(NativeActivityContext context, ActivityInstance completedInstance)
    {
        Result.Set(context, ResultVar.Get(context));
    }
}

I tried running NativeEval with the following:

WorkflowInvoker.Invoke(new NativeEval<int, int>(), new Dictionary<string, object>
    { { "ExpressionText", "Value + 2" }, { "Value", 5 } });

But got the following exception:

Activity '1: NativeEval' cannot access this variable because it is declared at the scope of activity '1: NativeEval'. An activity can only access its own implementation variables.

So I changed metadata.AddVariable(ResultVar); to metadata.AddImplementationVariable(ResultVar); but then I got a different exception:

The following errors were encountered while processing the workflow tree: 'VariableReference': The referenced Variable object (Name = 'ResultVar') is not visible at this scope. There may be another location reference with the same name that is visible at this scope, but it does not reference the same location.

I tried using .ScheduleFunc() as described here to schedule a VisualBasicValue activity, but the result it returned was always null (but oddly enough no exceptions were thrown).

I'm stumped. The metaprogramming model of WF4 seems much more difficult than the metaprogramming model of System.Linq.Expressions, which albeit difficult and often perplexing (like metaprogramming usually is), at least I was able to wrap my head around it. I guess it's because it has the added complexity of needing to represent a persistable, resumable, asynchronous, relocatable program, rather than just a plain old program.


EDIT: Since I don't think the issue I'm experiencing is caused by the fact that I'm trying to evaluate an expression that isn't hardcoded, the following alteration can be made to the NativeActivity that cause it to have a static expression:

Replace

Predicate = new VisualBasicValue<TResult>();

With

Predicate = new VisualBasicValue<TResult>("ExpressionText.Length");

And remove the line

Predicate.ExpressionText = ExpressionText.Get(context);

Now even though with those lines the expression is static, I'm still getting the same errors.


EDIT2: This article addressed the exception I was getting. I had to change both variable and child activity to be an "implementation", so this:

metadata.AddVariable(ResultVar);
metadata.AddChild(Assign);

Changed to this:

metadata.AddImplementationVariable(ResultVar);
metadata.AddImplementationChild(Assign);

And caused all the exceptions to go away. Unfortunately, it revealed that the following line does absolutely nothing:

Predicate.ExpressionText = ExpressionText.Get(context);

Changing the ExpressionText property of a VisualBasicValue during runtime has no effect. A quick check with ILSpy reveals why - the expression text is only evaluated and converted to an expression tree when CacheMetadata() is called, at which point the expression is not yet know, which is why I used the parameterless constructor which initialized and crystallized the expression to a no-op. I even tried saving the NativeActivityMetadata object I got in my own CacheMetadata overridden method and then use reflection to force a call to VisualBasicValue's CacheMetadata(), but that just ended up throwing a different cryptic exception ("Ambiguous match found." of type AmbiguousMatchException).

At this point it doesn't seem possible to fully integrate a dynamic expression into a workflow, exposing all the in-scope variables to it. I guess I'll have the method used in my Eval class within the NativeEval class.

share|improve this question
    
The problem with NativeActivity is that you want to pass an InArgument that is a string and somewhere during execution you say "ok, this is not a string, it's a VisualBasicValue!". I really don't see an easy way to do it. Heck I don't event known if something like this is possible, I guess not. Try this: first, on CacheMetadata, change methods to .AddImplementationVariable and .AddImplementationChild because that's what they really are: implementation properties. Now you've access to ResultVar and it even executes till the end but the result is 0. –  Jota Apr 24 '12 at 2:31
    
That's because when you do Predicate.ExpressionText = ... you're already on execution mode and the expression tree is already build and the ExpressionText that the invoker knows is string.Empty, null, nothing, whatever. –  Jota Apr 24 '12 at 2:34
    
Just out of curiosity initialize Predicate with a hardcoded expression text: Predicate = new VisualBasicValue() { ExpressionText = "Value + 2" }. Yes, that way it works. Unfortunately you don't have access to your InArgument<string> ExpressionText when building your child logic. Maybe someone knows a way. –  Jota Apr 24 '12 at 2:39
    
@Jota: I don't think this really has anything to do with being a runtime evaluated expression. I think this is simply my lack of a deep understanding of the WF4 API. Let's take the "dynamicness" out of the equation by making it a static expression evaluation - see my edit. –  Allon Guralnek Apr 24 '12 at 7:28
    
I'm not getting any errors. Force Assign to be part of the implementation just as the variable. That's what they really are. Check my edit to see why on Execute() changing Predicate.ExpressionText as no effect. –  Jota Apr 24 '12 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ended up using the following activity. It can't access the workflow's variables, instead it accepts a single argument 'Value' that can be used by the same name inside the dynamic expression. Other than that it works pretty well.

public class Evaluate<TIn, TOut> : NativeActivity<TOut>
{
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<string> ExpressionText { get; set; }

    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<TIn> Value { get; set; }

    protected override void Execute(NativeActivityContext context)
    {
        var result = new ExpressionEvaluator<TIn, TOut>(ExpressionText.Get(context)).EvalWith(Value.Get(context));
        Result.Set(context, result);
    }
}

public class ExpressionEvaluator<TIn, TOut> : Activity<TOut>
{
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<TIn> Value { get; set; }

    public ExpressionEvaluator(string predicate)
    {
        VisualBasic.SetSettingsForImplementation(this, VbSettings);

        Implementation = () => new Assign<TOut>
        {
            Value = new InArgument<TOut>(new VisualBasicValue<TOut>(predicate)),
            To = new ArgumentReference<TOut>("Result")
        };
    }

    public TOut EvalWith(TIn value)
    {
        return WorkflowInvoker.Invoke(this, new Dictionary<string, object> { { "Value", value } });
    }

    private static readonly VisualBasicSettings VbSettings;

    static ExpressionEvaluator()
    {
        VbSettings = new VisualBasicSettings();
        AddImports(typeof(TIn), VbSettings.ImportReferences);
        AddImports(typeof(TOut), VbSettings.ImportReferences);
    }

    private static void AddImports(Type type, ISet<VisualBasicImportReference> imports)
    {
        if (type.IsPrimitive || type == typeof(void) || type.Namespace == "System")
            return;

        var wasAdded = imports.Add(new VisualBasicImportReference { Assembly = type.Assembly.GetName().Name, Import = type.Namespace });

        if (!wasAdded)
            return;

        if (type.BaseType != null)
            AddImports(type.BaseType, imports); 

        foreach (var interfaceType in type.GetInterfaces())
            AddImports(interfaceType, imports);

        foreach (var property in type.GetProperties())
            AddImports(property.PropertyType, imports);

        foreach (var method in type.GetMethods())
        {
            AddImports(method.ReturnType, imports);

            foreach (var parameter in method.GetParameters())
                AddImports(parameter.ParameterType, imports);

            if (method.IsGenericMethod)
            {
                foreach (var genericArgument in method.GetGenericArguments())
                    AddImports(genericArgument, imports);
            }
        }

        if (type.IsGenericType)
        {
            foreach (var genericArgument in type.GetGenericArguments())
                AddImports(genericArgument, imports);
        }
    }
}

EDIT: Updated the class to include complete assembly and namespace imports, lest you get the dreaded (and unhelpful) error message:

'Value' is not declared. It may be inaccessible due to its protection level.

Also, moved the ExpressionEvaluator class outside and made it public, so you can used it outside of WF, like so:

new ExpressionEvaluator<int, double>("Value * Math.PI").EvalWith(2);

Which will return:

6.28318530717959

share|improve this answer
    
Would it be possible to pass in a different context to your elevator? I would like to be able to evaluate an expression from an activity using the context of that activity. –  gmang Mar 16 at 19:15
    
I'm sorry @gmang, it's been a few years since I touched WF and I'm not quite sure what you mean. My solution can't access the context of an activity anyway, so how would passing a different context be of any use? –  Allon Guralnek Mar 17 at 6:37
    
I am trying to evaluate expression added dynamically, see this post for explanation: stackoverflow.com/questions/29078210/… and when I tried your solution I got the error: 'Value' is not declared. It may be inaccessible due to its protection level. –  gmang Mar 17 at 9:39

I would suggest to use a different framework for this. One good approach is to use nCalc. http://ncalc.codeplex.com/

It can parse any expression and evaluate the result, including static or dynamic parameters and custom functions.

We use it to evaluate different kind of expressions at runtime.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the suggestion, but it is less suitable for three reasons: 1. it will be used within a workflow where VB.NET expression are heavily used in a static fashion (a reality of WF4), adding another language is a bit much. 2. The ability to access both BCL and custom .NET classes (including methods) inside an expression is required. 3. The expression must be able to natively access variables inside a workflow in order to actually be useful, otherwise the input parameters to such an expression would need to be explicitly specified and passed to an external parser such as nCalc. –  Allon Guralnek Apr 23 '12 at 20:10
    
Allon - I understand. yes introducing another technology can complicate things. Jota's reply seems to be a good answer. If you do not manage, then you can always fall back to my reply :). Thanks! –  Joseph Caruana Apr 24 '12 at 5:20

If your 'predicate' is a well-known string and don't need to be an expression evaluated at runtime you surely can do something like this, throwing away the InArgument and avoid the constructor:

public class Eval<T, TResult> : Activity<TResult>
{
    public string Expression { get; set; }

    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<T> Value { get; set; }

    protected override Func<Activity> Implementation
    {
        get
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(Expression))
            {
                return base.Implementation;
            }

            return () => new Assign<TResult>
            {
                Value = new InArgument<TResult>(new VisualBasicValue<TResult>(Expression)),
                To = new ArgumentReference<TResult>("Result")
            };
        }
        set
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
    }
}

and call it this way:

var activity = new Eval<int, int>() { Expression = "Value + 2" };

var inputArgs = new Dictionary<string, object>()
{
    { "Value", 5 }
};

Console.WriteLine("RESULT: " + WorkflowInvoker.Invoke<int>(activity, inputArgs));

EDIT: check that even with Predicate.ExpressionText not commented, it has no effect whatsoever:

public class NativeEval<T, TResult> : NativeActivity<TResult>
{
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<string> ExpressionText { get; set; }
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<T> Value { get; set; }

    private Assign Assign { get; set; }
    private VisualBasicValue<TResult> Predicate { get; set; }
    private Variable<TResult> ResultVar { get; set; }

    protected override void CacheMetadata(NativeActivityMetadata metadata)
    {
        base.CacheMetadata(metadata);

        Predicate = new VisualBasicValue<TResult>("ExpressionText.Length");
        ResultVar = new Variable<TResult>("ResultVar");
        Assign = new Assign { To = new OutArgument<TResult>(ResultVar), Value = new InArgument<TResult>(Predicate) };

        metadata.AddImplementationVariable(ResultVar);
        metadata.AddImplementationChild(Assign);
    }

    protected override void Execute(NativeActivityContext context)
    {
        // this line, commented or not, is the same!
        Predicate.ExpressionText = ExpressionText.Get(context);
        context.ScheduleActivity(Assign, new CompletionCallback(AssignComplete));
    }

    private void AssignComplete(NativeActivityContext context, ActivityInstance completedInstance)
    {
        // the result will always be the ExpressionText.Length 
        Result.Set(context, ResultVar.Get(context));
    }
}

When you get at Execute() method changing the child implementation has no effect. The execution mode is on and the children tree cannot be altered.

share|improve this answer
    
As the title of this question mentions, the expression is not known at all before runtime. This is basically for a rule engine where the user specifies the condition as a VB.NET expression stored as a string in the database. –  Allon Guralnek Apr 24 '12 at 7:10

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