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Looking at Mark Harris's reduction example, I am trying to see if I can have threads store intermediate values without reduction operation:

For example CPU code:

for(int i = 0; i < ntr; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < pos* posdir; j++)
    {
        val = x[i] * arr[j];
        if(val > 0.0)
        {
            out[xcount] = val*x[i];
            xcount += 1;
        }
    }
}

Equivalent GPU code:

const int threads = 64; 
num_blocks = ntr/threads;

__global__ void test_g(float *in1, float *in2, float *out1, int *ct, int posdir, int pos)
{
    int tid = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
    __shared__ float t1[threads];
    __shared__ float t2[threads];

    int gcount  = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < posdir*pos; i += 32) {
        if (threadIdx.x < 32) {
            t1[threadIdx.x] = in2[i%posdir];
        }
       __syncthreads();

        for(int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
        {
            t2[i] = t1[i] * in1[tid];
                if(t2[i] > 0){
                    out1[gcount] = t2[i] * in1[tid];
                    gcount = gcount + 1;
                }
        }
    }        
    ct[0] = gcount;
}

what I am trying to do here is the following steps:

(1)Store 32 values of in2 in shared memory variable t1,

(2)For each value of i and in1[tid], calculate t2[i],

(3)if t2[i] > 0 for that particular combination of i, write t2[i]*in1[tid] to out1[gcount]

But my output is all wrong. I am not even able to get a count of all the times t2[i] is greater than 0.

Any suggestions on how to save the value of gcount for each i and tid ?? As I debug, I find that for block (0,0,0) and thread(0,0,0) I can sequentially see the values of t2 updated. After the CUDA kernel switches focus to block(0,0,0) and thread(32,0,0), the values of out1[0] are re-written again. How can I get/store the values of out1 for each thread and write it to the output?

I tried two approaches so far: (suggested by @paseolatis on NVIDIA forums)

(1) defined offset=tid*32; and replace out1[gcount] with out1[offset+gcount],

(2) defined

__device__ int totgcount=0; // this line before main()
atomicAdd(&totgcount,1);
out1[totgcount]=t2[i] * in1[tid];

int *h_xc = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int) * 1);
cudaMemcpyFromSymbol(h_xc, totgcount, sizeof(int)*1, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
printf("GPU: xcount = %d\n", h_xc[0]); // Output looks like this: GPU: xcount = 1928669800

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance !

share|improve this question
    
Can you provide some typical values for ntr, posidr, and pos? Also, how many output points (xcount in the CPU code) would a typical calculation produce? –  talonmies Apr 23 '12 at 18:13
    
@talonmies: I tried out with the foll values: ntr = 128, pos = 1 and posdir = 32. –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 23 '12 at 18:26
    
@talonmies: is the memcpyfrom symbol the correct approach ?? –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 24 '12 at 13:11
    
Yes it is. Hopefully you have a cudaMemcpyToSymbol call to zero gcount if you are accessing it atomically. –  talonmies Apr 24 '12 at 13:38
    
How can one use cudaMemcpySymbol to zero gcount ?? I understood that you can set gcount = 0 explicitly before the kernel launched? –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 24 '12 at 14:41

2 Answers 2

OK let's compare your description of what the code should do with what you have posted (this is sometimes called rubber duck debugging).

  1. Store 32 values of in2 in shared memory variable t1

    Your kernel contains this:

    if (threadIdx.x < 32) {
        t1[threadIdx.x] = in2[i%posdir];
    }
    

    which is effectively loading the same value from in2 into every value of t1. I suspect you want something more like this:

    if (threadIdx.x < 32) {
        t1[threadIdx.x] = in2[i+threadIdx.x];
    }
    
  2. For each value of i and in1[tid], calculate t2[i],

    This part is OK, but why is t2 needed in shared memory at all? It is only an intermediate result which can be discarded after the inner iteration is completed. You could easily have something like:

    float inval = in1[tid];
    .......
    for(int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
    {
         float result = t1[i] * inval;
         ......
    
  3. if t2[i] > 0 for that particular combination of i, write t2[i]*in1[tid] to out1[gcount]

    This is where the problems really start. Here you do this:

            if(t2[i] > 0){
                out1[gcount] = t2[i] * in1[tid];
                gcount = gcount + 1;
            }
    

    This is a memory race. gcount is a thread local variable, so each thread will, at different times, overwrite any given out1[gcount] with its own value. What you must have, for this code to work correctly as written, is to have gcount as a global memory variable and use atomic memory updates to ensure that each thread uses a unique value of gcount each time it outputs a value. But be warned that atomic memory access is very expensive if it is used often (this is why I asked about how many output points there are per kernel launch in a comment).

The resulting kernel might look something like this:

__device__ int gcount; // must be set to zero before the kernel launch

__global__ void test_g(float *in1, float *in2, float *out1, int posdir, int pos)
{
    int tid = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
    __shared__ float t1[32];

    float ival = in1[tid];

    for(int i = 0; i < posdir*pos; i += 32) {
        if (threadIdx.x < 32) {
            t1[threadIdx.x] = in2[i+threadIdx.x];
        }
        __syncthreads();

        for(int j = 0; j < 32; j++)
        {
            float tval = t1[j] * ival;
            if(tval > 0){
                int idx = atomicAdd(&gcount, 1);
                out1[idx] = tval * ival
            }
        }
    }        
}

Disclaimer: written in browser, never been compiled or tested, use at own risk.....

Note that your write to ct was also a memory race, but with gcount now a global value, you can read the value after the kernel without the need for ct.


EDIT: It seems that you are having some problems with zeroing gcount before running the kernel. To do this, you will need to use something like cudaMemcpyToSymbol or perhaps cudaGetSymbolAddress and cudaMemset. It might look something like:

const int zero = 0;
cudaMemcpyToSymbol("gcount", &zero, sizeof(int), 0, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

Again, usual disclaimer: written in browser, never been compiled or tested, use at own risk.....

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback on t1[threadIdx.x] = in2[i%posdir]; But I thought of doing that because in most cases pos*posdir would be between 32 and 2048. Currently I am running this for ntr=128 and the execution time is 615 usec. Usually the value of ntr is about 200K, so I will run this code with atomicAdds and see how the time scaling works. Also, the race condition with gcount still occurs. I see the value of gcount as 1928669800. –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 23 '12 at 22:09
    
I did this after the kernel execution: int *h_xc = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int) * 1); cudaMemcpyFromSymbol(h_xc, gcount, sizeof(int)*1, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost); printf("GPU: xcount = %d\n", h_xc[0]); // Output looks like this: GPU: xcount = 1928669800 –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 23 '12 at 22:14
    
I tried out a different configuration: ntr=204800 and posdir=1024, the GPU execution time for 800 blocks and 256 threads = 21.322 ms. ( not sure if this is good, but it is better than the CPU time of 1.035 secs) –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 23 '12 at 22:43
    
Also, I did this change: int idx = atomicAdd(&gcount, 1); Was getting compiler error –  cuda_hpc80 Apr 24 '12 at 0:07
    
@cuda_hpc80: you did take note of the comment next to the first line? You will have to explicitly zero gcount before running the kernel. Also sorry about the syntax error, I wrote this code in the browser and forgot to add my usual cavaet. –  talonmies Apr 24 '12 at 4:48

A better way to do what you are doing is to give each thread its own output, and let it increment its own count and enter values - this way, the double-for loop can happen in parallel in any order, which is what the GPU does well. The output is wrong because the threads share the out1 array, so they'll all overwrite on it.

You should also move the code to copy into shared memory into a separate loop, with a __syncthreads() after. With the __syncthreads() out of the loop, you should get better performance - this means that your shared array will have to be the size of in2 - if this is a problem, there's a better way to deal with this at the end of this answer.

You also should move the threadIdx.x < 32 check to the outside. So your code will look something like this:

if (threadIdx.x < 32) {
    for(int i = threadIdx.x; i < posdir*pos; i+=32) {
        t1[i] = in2[i];
    }
}
__syncthreads();

for(int i = threadIdx.x; i < posdir*pos; i += 32) {
    for(int j = 0; j < 32; j++)
    {
         ...
    }
}

Then put a __syncthreads(), an atomic addition of gcount += count, and a copy from the local output array to a global one - this part is sequential, and will hurt performance. If you can, I would just have a global list of pointers to the arrays for each local one, and put them together on the CPU.

Another change is that you don't need shared memory for t2 - it doesn't help you. And the way you are doing this, it seems like it works only if you are using a single block. To get good performance out of most NVIDIA GPUs, you should partition this into multiple blocks. You can tailor this to your shared memory constraint. Of course, you don't have a __syncthreads() between blocks, so the threads in each block have to go over the whole range for the inner loop, and a partition of the outer loop.

share|improve this answer
    
That refactor doesn't do what the original code is trying to do, as best as I can tell. But you are right about the need for atomic addition on gcount. –  talonmies Apr 23 '12 at 20:41
    
@talonmies, thanks. I missed that. –  Vanwaril Apr 23 '12 at 21:59

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